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Animals In Print
The On-Line Newsletter

From 28 March 2001 Issue:

HOOF AND MOUTH DISEASE

What will happen to the meat industry when the first cases of Hoof and Mouth disease are discovered in America?

Those who say "it can't happen here" are not paying attention to what's happening in the rest of the world.

Hoof and Mouth disease is a communicable viral disease that affects cattle, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer. The disease is characterized by fever and blisterlike lesions on the tongue and lips, mouth, teats, and between the claws.

Can humans get Hoof and Mouth? Government scientists say no way. They are wrong. Humans have been known to catch Hoof and Mouth from animals. Symptoms in humans are sometimes confused with the flu. For the vast majority of people this would not be of great concern. For those who are sick or elderly, it could be deadly.

Many animals do not exhibit symptoms. Dogs, cats, mice, rats. However, these creatures can carry the virus from one farm to another. From one nation to another. These days, many nations spray the shoes of travelers at airports. Experts say that the wind carries the virus.

In February, England reacted to its first case of Hoof and Mouth Disease by taking measures to see that the virulent virus would not spread.

By March, millions of animals were either destroyed or in the process of being destroyed.

Despite government assurances of containment, Hoof and Mouth has spread to Scotland, Germany, and France.

American officials are also concerned. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has issued an alert to farmers, and there is now a ban on European meat. In issuing release # 0044A.01, USDA spokeswoman Kimberley Smith (301-734-6464) announced that USDA is temporarily prohibiting the importation of pigs, cows, sheep, and goats from the European Union. The USDA has also sent a team of experts (40 federal, state, and university officials) to Europe to monitor, evaluate, and assist in containment efforts.

Can Hoof and Mouth Disease cross the Atlantic Ocean?

This week, officials in Argentina confirmed at least one case of Hoof and Mouth Disease in a heavy cattle farming area in the northwest. Colombia has also detected its first two Hoof and Mouth outbreaks.

Yesterday (March 14, 2001), the United Nations' world food body (FAO) warned that Hoof and Mouth Disease is a global threat, and urged countries to adopt tougher counter measures, including stricter controls on immigrants and tourists.

The reaction to that warning was an angry statement issued by David Byrne, European Union Food Safety Commissioner. Byrne criticized countries that had taken "unnecessary and excessive" measures such as boycotting European animals. A few hours after Byrne's statement, the HOOF AND MOUTH DISEASE

What will happen to the meat industry when the first cases of Hoof and Mouth disease are discovered in America?

Hoof and Mouth disease is a communicable viral disease that affects cattle, pigs, sheep, goats, and deer. The disease is characterized by fever and blisterlike lesions on the tongue and lips, mouth, teats, and between the claws.

Can humans get Hoof and Mouth? Government scientists say no way. They are wrong. Humans have been known to catch Hoof and Mouth from animals. Symptoms in humans are sometimes confused with the flu. For the vast majority of people this would not be of great concern. For those who are sick or elderly, it could be deadly.

In February, England reacted to its first case of Hoof and Mouth Disease by taking measures to see that the virulent virus would not spread.

By March, millions of animals were either destroyed or in the process of being destroyed.

Despite government assurances of containment, Hoof and Mouth has spread to Scotland, Germany, and France.

American officials are also concerned. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has issued an alert to farmers, and there is now a ban on European meat. In issuing release # 0044A.01, USDA spokeswoman Kimberley Smith (301-734-6464) announced that USDA is temporarily prohibiting the importation of pigs, cows, sheep, and goats from the European Union. The USDA has also sent a team of experts (40 federal, state, and university officials) to Europe to monitor, evaluate, and assist in containment efforts.

Can Hoof and Mouth Disease cross the Atlantic Ocean?

This week, officials in Argentina confirmed at least one case of Hoof and Mouth Disease in a heavy cattle farming area in the northwest. Colombia has also detected its first two Hoof and Mouth outbreaks.

Yesterday (March 14, 2001), the United Nations' world food body (FAO) warned that Hoof and Mouth Disease is a global threat, and urged countries to adopt tougher counter measures, including stricter controls on immigrants and tourists.

The reaction to that warning was an angry statement issued by David Byrne, European Union Food Safety Commissioner. Byrne criticized countries that had taken "unnecessary and excessive" measures such as boycotting European animals. A few hours after Byrne's statement, the first cases of Hoof and Mouth were confirmed in the Middle East.

source: Robert Cohen
http://www.notmilk.com

Return to Animals in Print 28 Mar 2001 Issue

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