Stop Frog Dissections by 2014...Contest

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Originally Posted: 26 Jan 2011

Stop Frog Dissections by 2014...Contest

FROM  Save the Frogs

ACTION

The Race To Stop Dissections Contest asks students and teachers to assist worldwide amphibian conservation efforts by getting their schools and school districts to abandon their frog dissection programs.

As many alternatives to traditional frog dissections now exist (such as Digital Frog 2.5), it is inexcusable for schools and universities to continue their frog dissection programs and thereby directly contribute to the decline and extinction of amphibian populations and species.

Visit The Race To Stop Dissections contest page for all details about the contest.

INFORMATION / TALKING POINTS

Frog dissections are unethical and unnecessary. Furthermore, they are contributing to the depletion of wild frog populations and the spread of harmful invasive species and infectious diseases. As excellent alternatives exist, SAVE THE FROGS! highly recommends that schools switch to virtual dissection software such as the Digital Frog 2.5. We invite all students and teachers to assist worldwide amphibian conservation efforts by participating in our Race To Stop Dissections Contest.

Our goal is to have frog dissections out of every public school in the USA by 2014. That is not a lot of time, considering the huge number of schools that currently dissect. With your help though, we can achieve our goal! In 2011, we want 200 USA public schools to abandon their dissection programs: help us make it happen!

Dissections and frog declines

Frog populations are rapidly disappearing worldwide, and the use of frogs for dissection is a contributor to extinctions in many parts of the world:

  1. In many regions (including the USA!), frogs are taken out of the wild, severely depleting wild populations.
  2. Captive-raised frogs often carry harmful infectious diseases that they spread to native frog populations.
  3. Many of the frogs used in the dissection trade are known invasive species that are captive-raised outside of their native range. Inevitably, some of these frogs escape their holding facilities, reproduce, multiply and then prey onnative frogs and other wildlife.

Fortunately, the pressure the dissection trade puts on amphibian populations can be easily fixed: all we have to do is stop dissecting frogs!


Thank you for everything you do for animals!