Help Cats and Ferrets Used in Cruel Training at St. Louis Hospital

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Originally Posted: January 13, 2012

Help Cats and Ferrets Used in Cruel Training at St. Louis Hospital

[Ed. Note: Read Naval Medical Center Portsmouth Ends Ferret Abuse!]

FROM People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA)

ACTION

Please contact officials at St. Louis Children's Hospital and Washington University in St. Louis and urge them to replace the use of animals for intubation training with some of the many effective, non-animal training methods that are available.

Sign an online petition:
https://secure.peta.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=1686&autologin=true&utm_campaign=0112%20St%20Louis%20Hospital%20Action%20Alert&utm_source=PETA%20E-Mail&utm_medium=E-News

And/or better yet, make direct contact:

Joseph Gunn, MD
One Children's Place Emergency Department
St. Louis, MO 63110
Phone (314) 454-6111

David Jaffe, MD
One Children's Place Emergency Department
St. Louis, MO 63110
Phone (314) 454-6111

Mark Stephen Wrighton
Chancellor, Washington University in St. Louis
Campus Box 1192
One Brookings Drive
St. Louis, MO 63130
phone (314) 935-5100
wrighton@wustl.edu

INFORMATION / TALKING POINTS

St. Louis Children's Hospital, in conjunction with Washington University in St. Louis, continues to torment cats and ferrets for painful intubation training exercises in their Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) and pediatric residency programs. During the exercises, plastic tubes are repeatedly forced down the cats' windpipes. This procedure can cause bleeding, swelling, pain, scarring, collapsed lungs, and even death.

The PALS course's sponsor, the American Heart Association, states that it "does not require or endorse the use of animals in PALS courses" and that "the AHA recommends that any hands-on intubation training for the AHA PALS course be performed on lifelike human manikins." PETA has surveyed hundreds of PALS facilities across the country, and nearly every one of them—including St. Louis University, Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center, and St. Louis Community College—uses non-animal methods for intubation training. Similarly, more than 90 percent of pediatric residency programs in the U.S. use only non-animal methods for intubation training.

Research shows that in addition to protecting animals, simulators better prepare medical professionals to treat seriously ill or injured children because they more accurately replicate human anatomy and allow people to practice these skills repeatedly.


Thank you for everything you do for animals!