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Congress MUST act to save bats...7 million have already died!

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Originally Posted: April 3, 2012

Congress MUST act to save bats...7 million have already died!

FROM Center for Biological Diversity

ACTION

If bats continue to disappear, the number of insects will skyrocket, and scientists estimate the costs to farmers from crop loss and increased pesticide use could be between $3.7 billion and $53 billion a year. U.S. agriculture can't afford to lose bats -- nor can the rest of us. If left unchecked, white-nose syndrome will soon become a national disaster.

Please call or use the form below to ask your legislators to support this vital funding for the 2013 fiscal year. It's not a cure, but it's an excellent place to start.

Sign an online petition:
http://action.biologicaldiversity.org/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY=10071

And/or better yet, make direct contact:

Contact your U.S. Senators
http://www.senate.gov/
 
Contact your U.S. Representative
http://www.house.gov/

INFORMATION / TALKING POINTS

We're in the middle of another disastrous year for North American bats: White-nose syndrome, the bat-killing fungal disease that's been sweeping the country, has reached Alabama and Missouri. It continues to spread throughout the heartland, the core range of two endangered bat species. Nearly 7 million bats have died since the white-nose outbreak in 2006.

Right now the bats' best champions in Congress, Sens. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.), have requested $8.5 million for white-nose syndrome research and management. Funding to fight this disease, the worst wildlife-health crisis in U.S. history, is urgently needed to support biologists working on treatments and ways to slow it.

The money will also go to federal agencies like the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management to fund land management desperately needed to prevent human-caused transport of the deadly fungus, still absent in the West.

If bats continue to disappear, the number of insects will skyrocket, and scientists estimate the costs to farmers from crop loss and increased pesticide use could be between $3.7 billion and $53 billion a year. U.S. agriculture can't afford to lose bats -- nor can the rest of us. If left unchecked, white-nose syndrome will soon become a national disaster.  


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