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Protect ancient forests and spotted owls from industrial logging

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Originally Posted: June 27, 2012

Tell the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service to protect ancient forests and spotted owls from industrial logging

FROM The Sierra Club

ACTION

Environmental champions have worked for decades to protect the Spotted Owl and the ancient, pristine forests of the Northwest. Over a decade ago, Sierra Club and our allies won historic protections for a huge swath of these forests. We can't let these protections get rolled back.

Sign an online petition:
https://secure.sierraclub.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=9049

And/or better yet, make direct contact:

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
(800) 344-WILD (344-9453)
online contact form: http://www.fws.gov/duspit/contactus.htm

INFORMATION / TALKING POINTS

spotted owl, loggingThe majestic ancient forests of the Pacific Northwest are some of the most iconic wild places in America. But now the federal government is considering changes that will allow more logging, threatening the the spotted owl, black bears and elk that call these ancient forests home.

Environmental champions have worked for decades to protect the Spotted Owl and the ancient, pristine forests of the Northwest. Over a decade ago, Sierra Club and our allies won historic protections for a huge swath of these forests. We can't let these protections get rolled back.

Conservation of old-growth forests by the Northwest Forest Plan was a significant environmental advance that ended decades of unsustainable management practices. Studies show that the plan is working -- the highly fragmented forests are growing back into large blocks needed to maintain water quality and recover threatened species such as the Northern Spotted Owl.

The current draft critical habitat proposal for the northern spotted owl does not protect all habitat essential to the conservation and recovery of the spotted owl. The rule also proposes to exclude habitat on state and private lands necessary for recovery, particularly coastal redwood forests.

Additionally, the draft proposal would allow new, destructive logging in critical habitat and Late Successional Reserves that should be protected from such activities. There is little scientific evidence that logging in spotted owl habitat will protect it from fire or improve forest health. More likely, industrial logging activities in critical habitat and mature and old growth forest stands will push spotted owls closer to the brink of extinction, increase the risk of fire, and damage forest and watershed health.

The protections for mature and old growth forest habitat that are currently contained in the Northwest Forest Plan should not be weakened or eliminated. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service must ensure that currently protected Late Successional Reserves are maintained throughout the region.

Please also protect streamside areas and all remaining mature and old growth forests on these public lands to ensure the recovery of northern spotted owls and other threatened species, and that the many special places of the Northwest's forests remain intact for future generations. Clearcutting should not be allowed and mining activities that threaten clean water and the Northwest's iconic salmon should be removed.

Sincerely...


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