Letter from the New President of Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting
Article posted by C.A.S.H. Committee To Abolish Sport Hunting

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From Jim Robertson

Learn about Jim's Book - Exposing the Big Game: Targets of a Dying Sport

Jim Robertson

Some of C.A.S.H.’s longtime members may be wondering who the heck is this guy and what qualifies him to be president of the Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting? Others may know me from my 2012 book, Exposing the Big Game: Living Targets of a Dying Sport. For those in the first group, here's some backstory from the publisher's biography page...

Living among the likes of deer, elk, wolves and bears has led to a keen awareness of animals as individuals. Yet, with wildlife habitat comes the depraved concept of “sportsmen’s paradise” and, consequently, the wanton evils of hunting. The painful loss of some of his cherished animal neighbors has triggered an evolution from outspoken animal advocate to all out anti-hunter.

Exposing the Big Game challenges the archaic, yet officially endorsed, viewpoint that the primary value of wildlife in America is to provide cheap entertainment for anyone with a gun and an unwholesome urge to kill. Portraits and portrayals of tolerant bears, loquacious prairie dogs, temperamental wolves, high-spirited ravens and benevolent bison will leave readers with a deeper appreciation of our fellow beings as sovereign individuals, each with his or her unique personality.

Above all, this book is a condemnation of violence against animals, both historic and ongoing. It explores the true, sinister motives behind hunting and trapping, dispelling the myths that sportsmen use to justify their brutal acts. Exposing the Big Game takes on hunting and defends the animals with equal passion, while urging us to expand our circle of compassion and re-examine our stance on killing for sport.

And as I said in the book's epilogue: Sooner or later, the obdurate hunter crouching in the darkness of ages past must cave in and make peace with the animals or rightfully, if figuratively, die off and be replaced with a more compassionate, more evolved earthling.

Since I started working for C.A.S.H. last fall, I've recorded scores of hunting accidents. Although there's certainly a sense of satisfaction in learning just how many of these hunting excursions end up disappointing or even tragic for these murderous perpetrators, I plan to take C.A.S.H. in a slightly different direction as well. Knowing that each and every successful kill a hunter makes is yet another tragedy for the animals, I'm going to try to re-personalize and re-value the animal victims of hunting, bringing them back to life, so to speak, as they naturally are when viewed in the wild or appreciated in a photo.

CLICK HERE for more from CASH COURIER NEWSLETTER, Winter/Spring 2018

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