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C.A.S.H. Letters to the Editor > 2007

C.A.S.H. Letters

Youth Hunting

300 wds to the Marquette, MI Mining Journal http://24.213.59.98/vnr/add_submission.asp?categoryID=484&publicationID=74 

Escanaba Daily Press - less than 500 wds to

http://24.213.59.98/vnr/add_submission.asp?categoryID=718&publicationID=77 

Sault St. Marie Evening News - less than 500 wds to

editor@sooeveningnews.com 

379 wds

9/24/07

To The Editor:

On Saturday morning, the state DNR opened a two-day special hunting season designed to lure children into the violent and dangerous world of sport hunting.

Hunters often use doctored statistics to “prove” that hunting is safe, but how safe can a sport be when the object is to kill your opponent? In a random sampling of 190 hunting accidents that took place during calendar year 2006, more than eighteen percent victimized children aged eighteen and younger. These statistics are rarely cited by hunting organizations but the dangers are real.

Hunting agencies such as the state DNR use children as pawns in their scheme to increase participation in hunting. Because the division is funded through the fees collected from hunting licenses and the excise tax on weapons and ammunition, it must lure children into its violent world if it is to remain financially solvent and continue to exploit wildlife well into the future.

Rather than destroying their natural affinity to animals, children should be encouraged to engage in outdoor activities that respect nature, such as camping, hiking, and wildlife watching. Much to the chagrin of the weapons and hunting industries which profit from the slaughter of wildlife, wildlife watching is the dominant form of wildlife-related outdoor recreation in the state. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, only 756,000 people aged 16 and older hunted in 2006, while more than three-times as many people (2,826,000) observed, fed, and photographed wildlife in their natural habitat. Hunting is clearly an unpopular hobby that is becoming more unpopular every year.

The future of wildlife management lies in wildlife watching programs which can support an economy that far surpasses the current one dependent on weapons and violence. Let’s repeal the tax on weapons and ammunition and replace it with one on items such as binoculars, backpacks, and other outdoor-related equipment used by wildlife watchers. Funds collected from these taxes can be dedicated toward the preservation of wildlife and the areas where they live, making the need to depend on hunting obsolete.

The time has come to change the way wildlife is managed and to prevent our children from becoming pawns of the weapons industry. To protect wildlife and the areas where they live while simultaneously promoting a more peaceful world, please visit www.cashwildwatch.org.

Joe Miele, Vice President Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting P.O. Box 562 New Paltz, NY 12561 201-880-4989

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287 wds

9/24/07

To The Editor:

On Saturday morning, the DNR opened a special two-day hunting season designed to lure children into the violent world of sport hunting, thereby using children as pawns in its scheme to increase participation in hunting. Because the DNR is funded through the sale of hunting licenses and the excise tax on weapons and ammunition, it must lure children into its violent world if it is to remain financially solvent and continue to exploit wildlife well into the future.

Rather than destroying their natural affinity to animals, children should be encouraged to engage in outdoor activities that respect nature, such as camping, hiking, and wildlife watching, which is the dominant form of wildlife-related outdoor recreation in the state. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, only 756,000 people aged 16 and older hunted in 2006, while more than three-times as many people (2,826,000) observed, fed, and photographed wildlife in their natural habitat. Hunting is clearly an unpopular hobby that is becoming more unpopular every year.

The future of wildlife management lies in wildlife watching programs which can support an economy that far surpasses the current one dependent on weapons and violence. Let’s repeal the tax on weapons and ammunition and replace it with one on items such as binoculars, backpacks, and other outdoor-related equipment used by wildlife watchers. Funds collected from these taxes can be dedicated toward the preservation of wildlife and the areas where they live, making the need to depend on hunting obsolete.

The time has come to change the way wildlife is managed and to prevent our children from becoming pawns of the weapons industry. To protect wildlife and the areas where they live while simultaneously promoting a more peaceful world, please visit www.cashwildwatch.org.

Joe Miele, Vice President Committee to Abolish Sport Hunting P.O. Box 562 New Paltz, NY 12561 201-880-4989

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http://www.wluctv6.com/Global/story.asp?S=7096860&nav=81AX

Upper Peninsula, September 19 Michigan DNR Gets Younger Generation Involved In Hunting

Many young hunters have their sights set on Saturday morning and the first opportunity of the year to harvest a deer.

The annual two day special season is one way the DNR is getting a new generation involved in the sport. New rules this year allow properly licensed hunters to take an antlered or antler-less deer.

The hunt is open to ages 10 through 16. It's an opportunity to learn from an adult mentor while discovering the fun and responsibility of hunting.

"We don't want to make this a bad experience for any young person, so keep in mind that no bait is allowed, there are rules and regulations that apply; most of all to assure the youth has a safe hunt and be accompanied at all times with an experienced hunter," stated Ann Feldhauser of the Michigan DNR.

Before heading out to the woods, hunters are advised to consult the hunting and trapping guide for a more detailed look at the rules.

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C.A.S.H.
PO Box 562 New Paltz, NY 12561
Phone 845-256-1400 Fax 845-818-3622
E-mail: cash@cashwildwatch.org
Anne Muller - President

 

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