Take Heart
From Christian Vegetarian Association (CVA)

Luke 5:2-11; John 21:5-8

Jesus assisted his disciples in fishing (Luke 5:2-11; John 21:5-8)

“And he saw two boats by the lake; but the fishermen had gone out of them and were washing their nets.  Getting into one of the boats, which was Simon's, he asked him to put out a little from the land. And he sat down and taught the people from the boat. And when he had ceased speaking, he said to Simon, "Put out into the deep and let down your nets for a catch."
And Simon answered, "Master, we toiled all night and took nothing! But at your word I will let down the nets." And when they had done this, they enclosed a great shoal of fish; and as their nets were breaking, they beckoned to their partners in the other boat to come and help them. And they came and filled both the boats, so that they began to sink.

But when Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus' knees, saying, "Depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord." For he was astonished, and all that were with him, at the catch of fish which they had taken; and so also were James and John, sons of Zeb'edee, who were partners with Simon. And Jesus said to Simon, "Do not be afraid; henceforth you will be catching men." And when they had brought their boats to land, they left everything and followed him.”

Jesus helped disciples catch a vast quantity of fish. In Luke, the event is depicted as his first call of the disciples. Many Biblical scholars see the events symbolically, and from a symbolic standpoint, Jesus assisting the disciples in netting massive quantities of fish could not be much clearer, especially considering his promise that he will make them "fishers of men." They are bringing disciples (fish) into the fold.

A literal reading of the text shows animals cooperating with Jesus to prove his divinity. In Luke, the miraculous catch prompted the fishermen to follow Jesus, who told them, "Henceforth, you will be catching men." When they returned to shore, they "left everything, and followed him." This demonstrates that killing fish was not the point of the story. In John, miraculously catching a massive quantity of fish once again established Jesus’ divine identity. Jesus then ate the fish, demonstrating that he was resurrected in the flesh. Again, the story is about an important teaching, not enjoying tasty food. 

In Luke and John, Jesus helped disciples catch a vast quantity of fish. In Luke, the event is depicted as his first call of the disciples. In John, the event occurs after the resurrection.
 
Many Biblical scholars see the events symbolically, and from a symbolic standpoint, Jesus assisting the disciples in netting massive quantities of fish could not be much clearer, especially considering his promise that he will make them "fishers of men." They are bringing disciples (fish) into the fold.
 
A literal reading of the text shows animals cooperating with Jesus to prove his divinity. In Luke, the miraculous catch prompted the fishermen to follow Jesus, who told them, "Henceforth, you will be catching men." When they returned to shore, they "left everything, and followed him." This demonstrates that killing fish was not the point of the story. In John, miraculously catching a massive quantity of fish once again established Jesus’ divine identity. Jesus then ate the fish, demonstrating that he was resurrected in the flesh. Again, the story is about an important teaching, not enjoying tasty food.