Cornell UniversityDepartment of Natural ResourcesCollege of Veterinary MedicineCayuga Heights Deer Project
General Background
Project History
Feasibility Study - Phase 1
Surgical Sterility Study - Phase 2
SpayVacTM - Phase 3
Capture Techniques
Photo-Survey Population Study
Community Involvement 
Deer Observation
Reducing Deer Damage
Contact
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  SpayVacTM - Phase 3

SpayVacTM developed by ImmunoVaccine Technologies Inc. (IVT), is a single-dose immunocontraceptive vaccine that will control fertility of females for multiple years.  In a research herd at Penn State University, SpayVacTM has been nearly 100% effective for 4 years.  The use of SpayVacTM  will significantly reduce the cost of controlling the deer herd in Cayuga Heights by eliminating the expense of surgery, and the labor costs associated with deer transport and recovery.  Stress on the deer will be greatly reduced also, as deer will need only enough tranquilizer to safely remove them form the traps or nets, attach the ear tags and a collar, and administer the SpayVacTM .  This reduces handling time from potentially 3-7 hours to get through surgery and recovery, to reversing the sedative in as little as 20 minutes after capture and tagging. 

We must continue to bait and trap the deer to administer SpayVacTM for several reasons.  Special permission would still be needed to use a dart rifle in the Village.  Also, US-FDA still requires that the deer need to be identified as an experimental animal that should not be consumed.  This is a concern in the event of the deer leaving the community to an area that it could be hunted, or if it were killed in a vehicle accident.  Identification is also important to the ongoing study of the deer behavior, movements, and monitoring population.  Having deer marked reduces the potential cost of possibly retreating the same doe several times.

After ten successful surgical sterilizations in February 2004, we received our first samples of SpayVacTM and started using it in March.  We now have 10 deer injected with SpayVacTM and will continue to trap and vaccinate female deer during January - April 2005. 

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WildlifeControl.info | General Background | Project History | Feasibility Study - Phase 1
 Surgical Sterility Study - Phase 2 | SpayVacTM - Phase 3 | Capture Techniques
 
Photo-Survey Population Study | Community Involvement  | Deer Observation
Reducing Deer Damage | Contact | Home

College of Veterinary Medicine | Department of Natural Resources


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