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Humane Religion Magazine

July - August 1996 Issue

FROM THE PULPIT

Dr. Robert Runcie, Archbishop 0f Canterbury. (1982)

In the end, a lack of regard for the life and well-being of an animal must bring with it a lowering of man’s self respect, and it is integral to our Christian faith that this world is God’s world and that man is a trustee and steward of God’s creation who must render up an account for his stewardship.

Church and Nation Report of the Church of Scotland, (1978)

Man, left to his own devices, is inclined to get his relationships wrong, whether it be in regard to God, his fellow-man or his fellow-creatures. In his relationship to the animals man misuses his authority in the direction of exploitation and cruelty. Nevertheless, he regains his true relationship as a responsible steward to the Creation to the degree that he becomes “renewed in his mind” in regard to that particular relationship (:Romans 12:2).

General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland. (1956)

The General Assembly, recognizing the welfare of animals and their just treatment as an essential part of Christian responsibility, urge members of the Church to be active in this sphere of service, and commend to their support the work of the Societies for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals throughout Ireland. They recommend that this matter be kept before congregations, Sunday Schools and organizations of the Church through instruction and intercession.

Society of Friends, Yearly London Meeting. (1981)

Our stewardship of the world does not allow us to exercise an absolute right over animals. All animals should be treated as if they have rights and as if they suffer pain and stress similar to human experience.. Some activities, like killing for sport and aspects of trapping or hunting which involve cruelty in a cruel death, are indefensible and we need to urge those who engage in these activities to reconsider their position. #

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