UW research on animals gets new federal scrutiny
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Dr. Robert Gibbens
Director, Western Region USDA/APHIS/AC
2150 Center Ave. Building B, Mailstop 3W11
Fort Collins, CO 80526-8117
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Please contact Dr. Robert Gibbens to demand a major fine against the University of Washington, Seattle, for the negligence which allowed three monkeys to be killed. Their utter disregard for the animals and the Animal Welfare Act CANNOT be tolerated and MUST be punished to the fullest extent of the law.

 

UW research on animals gets new federal scrutiny
By Katherine Long, SeattleTimes.com, March 17, 2016

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is again investigating animal research at the University of Washington, but officials there say the procedure in question is no longer being used.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is conducting an investigation into animal research at the University of Washington, the second such investigation in recent years.

The department, which is charged with overseeing the welfare of animals used in research, won’t comment on an ongoing investigation. But UW officials say the research procedure in question is no longer being used.

In recent months, USDA officials raised concerns about skull implants in nonhuman primates. According to a July inspection report posted on USDA’s website, three animals “had significant health issues” after the surgical procedures and were euthanized.

Investigations are opened if a facility is out of compliance with the federal law that governs animal research, and if the noncompliance “is particularly grievous or a facility is in repeated noncompliance,” Tanya Espinosa, a public-affairs specialist for the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, wrote in an email.

n recent months, USDA officials raised concerns about skull implants in nonhuman primates. According to a July inspection report posted on USDA’s website, three animals “had significant health issues” after the surgical procedures and were euthanized.

Investigations are opened if a facility is out of compliance with the federal law that governs animal research, and if the noncompliance “is particularly grievous or a facility is in repeated noncompliance,” Tanya Espinosa, a public-affairs specialist for the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, wrote in an email.

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