Tribute To Oscar

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Tribute To Oscar

August 2011

It is with great sadness that the producers of A Bird of the Air announce the passing the titular star of the film; Oscar the Parrot. Throughout his amazingly long career spanning live theater, television (Fantasy Island), print advertising and film (Home Alone 3), Oscar was beloved by his co-stars - both human and animal alike. At the time of his death it was estimated that Oscar was over 60 years old.

Oscar’s final role was also his most prominent – this fall’s indie romantic-comedy A Bird of the Air co-starring Rachel Nichols (Conan the Barbarian, Star Trek ) and Jackson Hurst (Drop Dead Diva). The film provided Oscar with his most significant role and it is in this film that the spirit and memory of Oscar will live on. Here is a tribute to Oscar, including some of his finest moments from A Bird of the Air.

A Bird of the Air is based on Joe Coomer's highly acclaimed novel, The Loop. Hailed as “deliciously quirky and perceptive,” by Publishers Weekly, and “impossible to resist” by The New Yorker, Coomer’s 1992 novel tells the story of Lyman (Hurst), a lovable loner whose job patrolling highways at night, aiding stranded motorists and injured animals, keeps him at a distance from other people. When an extremely rare and highly talkative parrot flies into his home one day, Lyman needs to figure out where the bird comes from and tries to decode its often cryptic and highly literary utterances. Enlisting the aid of Fiona (Nichols), a sexy librarian who is as interested in Lyman’s secrets as she is in the bird’s, the pair set off on a search that doesn’t always lead them where they think they’re going, but which gradually leads them to one another. Named one of the “Notable Books of the Year,” by The New York Times, Coomer’s novel was adapted for the screen by Roger Towne, whose credits include the film adaptation of Bernard Malamud’s The Natural.