Weekly Newsletter from Christian Vegetarian Association CVA - February 7, 2020
From Christian Vegetarian Association (CVA)


  1. Activist Feedback
  2. Overcoming Conflicts with Truth – Part 1: Motivations
  3. All-Creatures.org Ministry

1. Activist Feedback

Ben, who leafleted at Winter Jam at Jacksonville, FL on 1/10, writes:

1,200 CVA booklets

Excellent day... After going through the line for about an hour, I was told by security to leave the arena premises. I went to the adjacent sidewalks and had lots of success, especially in the hour before the doors opened. Generally a very friendly crowd... Had some great conversations... lots of steak eaters that were able to have a laugh with me and talk about it. Some of them were open to hearing about alternatives. Just before I left one man came running up behind me and told me that he and his wife as well as 30 members of their small congregation in Charleston did a 21-day vegan "fast" and have been vegan for 6-8 weeks now! He invited me to join him at his congregation when I am in Charleston. He also emailed me "The Biggest Little Farm," a movie that I have been wanting to see.


2. Overcoming Conflicts with Truth – Part 1: Motivations

Last week, I discussed how compassion can help us transcend the conflicts that arise from rivalries that, as humans, we cannot fully avoid. Another key tool is truth. I first want to look at human motivations.

When we disagree with other people, we are tempted to believe that our motivations are better. Human opinions and choices generally have multiple motivations, and it behooves us to remember that we can’t be sure that our motives are always good and pure and that others might have good motivations that we fail to appreciate.

This is relevant to how we interact with people when it comes to animal issues. It can be hard to be charitable toward those who sponsor animal abuse. But, there is often room for compassion when we know their full story. For example, many people struggle to find pleasure in life, and they believe (I think incorrectly) that consuming animal products is necessary for them to enjoy their meals. Also, people might fear being ostracized if they refused to join family and friends in consuming animals.

It is tempting to condemn people who sponsor animal abuse. However, if we seek respectful, productive conversations and if we hope people would make more animal-friendly choices, I suggest that we ask questions. This can lead to greater understanding for you and them. Why do they eat animal products? What are the perceived barriers to reducing or stopping consumption of animal products? For the dedicated hamburger-eater, have they ever tried the Beyond Burger? By being inquisitive and nonjudgmental, the conversation might leave both of you better informed and better able to live in ways that accord with your values.

3. All-Creatures.org Ministry


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