Animal rights group files complaint against Harvard Medical School claiming violations of federal law
Media Coverage About SAEN Stop Animal Exploitation Now

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Dr. Elizabeth Goldentyer
Director, USDA, Eastern Region
(919) 855-7100
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Please LEVY a MAXIMUM FINE against the Harvard Medical School, for their blatant disregard of the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) when their negligence allowed a monkey to die of strangulation. This behavior must NOT be tolerated and MUST be punished to the fullest extent of the law.

 

Animal rights group files complaint against Harvard Medical School claiming violations of federal law

From Tanner Stening, MassLive.com, December 3, 2019

An animal rights group filed a federal complaint against Harvard Medical School after a monkey in a research lab died of strangulation over the summer.

The complaint, filed by SAEN (Stop Animal Exploitation NOW!) on Nov. 30 with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, alleges that the death of a monkey on July 28 violates the federal Animal Welfare Act.

According to a letter detailing the incident from Harvard to the the National Institutes of Health, the macaque had strangled itself through a hole it had ripped in a covering over its cage.

“In response to this incident, all hanging surrogates have been removed from macaque cages,” writes Lisa Muto, executive dean for administration at Harvard Medical School.

Michael Budkie, SAEN’s executive director, notes in the complaint that Harvard researchers were conducting research that involved isolating the monkey from members of its species, writing that “it is highly likely that this project caused these animals to experience unrelieved distress due to lack of normal social interaction with members of their own species, or humans.”

“I insist that your office launch a full investigation of the incidents surrounding this death and these fraudulent reports, and at the conclusion of the investigation, punish this criminal laboratory with the maximum penalty of $10,000 per infraction/per animal,” Budkie writes.

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