Protect Exotic Animals in Las Vegas
Action Alert from All-Creatures.org

FROM

Animal Legal Defense Fund (ALDF)
September 2015

ACTION

The State of Nevada has no laws restricting or regulating the private ownership of tigers, lions, and other dangerous wild animals kept as pets.

Clark County Commissioners are now accepting public comments until October 2nd and we need your help to make sure that this important ordinance passes!

At a time when most states have banned the ownership of dangerous wild animals as pets, this ordinance is a very minimally necessary compromise position and should be passed without delay.

Please contact the Clark County Commissioners and Director of Animal Control by completing the form below. If you are a resident of Nevada or Clark County, be sure to note that in your email.

Please email the Clark County Commissioners and Director of Animal Control by completing the form below. If you are a resident of Nevada or Clark County, be sure to note that in your email. To be most effective, please personalize the subject line and body of the email.

Sign an online petition here

AND/OR better yet, make direct contact:

Clark County Department of Animal Contrl
2911 East Sunset Road
Las Vegas NV 89120
[email protected]
phone (702) 455-7710

INFORMATION

SAMPLE LETTER; use your OWN WORDS!

As someone who cares not only about humane treatment of animals, but public health and safety, I respectfully urge you to pass the proposed changes to Title 10 of the Clark County Code posted on September 9, 2015, without delay, and without any additional exemptions.

Because the State of Nevada does not oversee ownership of exotic animals kept as pets, Clark County will continue to be a safe haven for irresponsible owners of tigers, lions, chimpanzees and other dangerous wild animals unless the proposed ordinance is passed without revisions and without additional exemptions. This ordinance provides reasonable minimum standards without which Clark County law enforcement and public safety officers have no way of even knowing how many dangerous animals are being kept as pets in the communityŚlet alone how they are being housed, handled, and treated. In addition, exempting individuals or organizations not expressly listed in the current version of the ordinance would establish gaping loopholes and render the ordinance virtually meaningless.

At a time when most states have banned the ownership of dangerous wild animals as pets, this ordinance is a very minimally necessary compromise position and should be passed without delay.

Thank you for doing the right thing for animals and public safety.


Thank you for everything you do for animals!


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