100 Neglected Sled Dogs Rescued in Northern Quebec

From all-creatures.org
Animal Rights Articles

Moo-ving people toward compassionate living

Visit our Home Page
Write us with your comments

100 Neglected Sled Dogs Rescued in Northern Quebec

From Humane Society International Canada

Tragically, this situation is not unique, with cases of neglect of sled dogs regularly reported in Canada. HSI and the SPCA LL are calling upon the provincial and federal government to pass stronger animal protection laws to ensure the protection of all dogs.

Humane Society International and the SPCA Laurentides-Labelle partnered to rescue approximately 100 neglected sled dogs in the Upper Laurentians of Quebec. The owner was unable to care properly for his dogs and released them to the care of the SPCA LL.

"This rescue will prevent the situation from getting worse: among the dogs we took in, approximately 30 females are pregnant," said Corinne Gonzalez, executive director, SPCA LL. "Without our intervention, the owner could easily have found himself with 150 more puppies when winter is right around the corner. The SPCA LL is asking the population for financial help for part of the food and vet fees for these dogs during their stay in Val-Morin."

Rescuers are swiftly removing the dogs and transporting them to an emergency shelter in Val-Morin, where all of the dogs will receive veterinary treatment, food, water and care. As soon as possible, the dogs will be brought to rescue groups in Canada and in the United States, where they will be sterilized and adopted into loving homes.

United Animal Nations has deployed a team of volunteers to staff the emergency shelter in cooperation with HSI and the SPCA LL.

"United Animal Nations volunteers are expert at running temporary shelters and supporting communities that become overwhelmed by a large influx of animals," said UAN emergency services manager Janell Matthies. "They will work non-stop to give these rescued dogs clean kennels, food, water and attention like they never experienced before."

Tragically, this situation is not unique, with cases of neglect of sled dogs regularly reported in Canada. HSI and the SPCA LL are calling upon the provincial and federal government to pass stronger animal protection laws to ensure the protection of all dogs. For sled dogs, sterilization and planning for the care of the dogs during the eight-month low season should be a priority.

Earlier this year, The Humane Society of the United States, the American partner of HSI, delivered 25,000 pounds of dog food to remote Alaskan villages to assist sled dogs and their owners affected by flooding of the Yukon River.