"Urban Chicken Farming" Victims Discarded...Now Safe

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"Urban Chicken Farming" Victim Now Safe

[Ed. Note: Also read: The Perils and Pleasures of Urban Backyard Chicken-keeping and Collective Position Statement on Backyard Poultry. Why "keep" chickens except to exploit them for their eggs or flesh? How many people have chickens as companion animals? Go vegan!]

From Animal Place Sanctuary

Instead of being treated as cherished companions, like one would with a family dog or cat, animals used for their eggs and flesh are treated as disposable commodities. There is no intrinsic difference between industrial farming and urban animal farming - the end result is either a dead or abandoned animal, unwanted, unworthy of basic care and love.

 You can help chickens the most by simply not eating them! Reduce your reliance on both chicken meat and eggs by opting into a plant-based day of the week or transitioning completely over to veganism.

Two victims of the urban animal farming movement have arrived to Animal Place. Skylar and Dakota are from two different cities but have similar stories.

Dakota

When an employee of the Sacramento Zoo opened the gates, she found a person with a chicken. They had bought the chick a few weeks ago but because chickens are illegal in Sacramento city limits decided to "get rid of the bird". The zoo staffer explained they did not take chickens and suggested the animal shelter.

Instead they dumped the chick at the city park across the street.

The zoo employee's mother happened to be in the area and when she heard the chick had been abandoned she did not hesitate to act.

She drove to the park and found the bird. The chick immediately jumped into the woman's arms. This young chicken would not have survived the night.

Dakota, lover of food and head scratches, is safe and sound because someone put their compassion into action.

Skylar - Birdseed and Balconies

Skylar spent the past year fending for herself - with the help of her human neighbors - after she was abandoned in a Berkeley neighborhood.

The town home association was concerned about the bird - she was surviving off of birdseed and slept in garages, balconies, and sometimes the recycling bin!

The hen was likely abandoned after her egg production decreased. She may have developed an ovarian cyst or infection that has caused her to crow and act more rooster-like. Instead of valuing her gentle and sweet personality, she was dumped.

Chickens Are For Life

Skylar and Dakota highlight some of the problems with the backyard chicken movement and urban animal farming in general. Instead of being treated as cherished companions, like one would with a family dog or cat, animals used for their eggs and flesh are treated as disposable commodities. There is no intrinsic difference between industrial farming and urban animal farming - the end result is either a dead or abandoned animal, unwanted, unworthy of basic care and love.

Chickens are for life.

Adopt, Don't Buy

Are you prepared to welcome chickens into your home for the next 6-12 years? Ready to handle novel medical problems from chickens becoming egg-bound to lice and mites? Have enough space and secure fencing to safely house chickens? Is it even legal where you are located? If you're getting ready to consider adding chickens to your life, adopt! Our Rescue Ranch program often has many needy and adoptable hens. Put in as much thought and effort as you would in adding a dog or cat to your family.

Remember, you can help chickens the most by simply not eating them! Reduce your reliance on both chicken meat and eggs by opting into a plant-based day of the week or transitioning completely over to veganism!