Attitudes Towards Animals Over The Past Three Decades
An Animal Rights Article from All-Creatures.org

FROM

Faunalytics
November 2016

With an increase in urbanization, income, and education has led to a change in Americans' attitudes toward wildlife, shifting from one of domination to one of caring and compassion.

The authors note that their results are consistent with other findings that show how an increase in urbanization, income, and education has led to a change in Americans' attitudes toward wildlife, shifting from one of domination to one of caring and compassion.

They also speculate that historically stigmatized species such as sharks and bats are viewed more positively because the public has greater access to information about them through scientific publications and science-based media programming.

In addition, the public views rats more positively, in part because of growing concern for animals used in scientific research. Finally, they note that increasing urbanization has led to a rise in human-wildlife conflicts with raccoons and swans but not with wolves, who avoid urban areas, or coyotes, who avoid interacting with people.

Read more at Faunalytics: Attitudes Towards Animals Over The Past Three Decades


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