Former Humane Society Officials Barred from Charity Work

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Former Humane Society Officials Barred from Charity Work

By Howard Pankratz, DenverPost.com
January 2010

The attorney general filed a civil lawsuit in Arapahoe County District Court against Gardner and the Warrens in December 2008 alleging that they, through the Colorado Humane Society, violated numerous provisions of Colorado law.

The former executive director of the Colorado Humane Society and her husband have been barred from operating or managing charitable organizations for the next decade, Colorado Attorney General John Suthers announced Wednesday.

In addition, the pair — former executive director Mary Warren and her husband, Robert Warren, the former development director of the society — are prohibited from owning and operating any business such as an animal shelter for the next five years.

Mary Warren's daughter, Stephanie L. Gardner, who was director of the organization's operations, is barred from operating a charity for the next two years and operating any business covered by the Colorado Pet Animal Care Facilities Act.

The attorney general filed a civil lawsuit in Arapahoe County District Court against Gardner and the Warrens in December 2008 alleging that they, through the Colorado Humane Society, violated numerous provisions of Colorado law.

The court agreed in December to allow the sale of the Colorado Humane Society's assets, including its name. The new Humane Society of the South Platte Valley has been founded to serve Littleton and Englewood.

In the consent decree, the Warrens and Gardner said they were entering the settlement for the purpose of resolving the disputed claims and to avoid the expense of litigation. The decree explicitly said that the Warrens and Gardner were not admitting liability or admitting any of the claims made by investigators.

In the civil lawsuit, Suthers alleged that the Colorado Humane Society euthanized nearly 30 percent of the animals at the Englewood facility that was sometimes advertised as a "no-kill" shelter