What's It Like To Be a Bee?
An Animal Rights Article from All-Creatures.org

FROM

Earth in Transition
April 2016

People believed for thousands of years before human exceptionalism took over and replaced panpsychism, as it's known, with the illogical notion that only we humans are conscious and that the other animals just operate off blind instinct.

honey bee

In a new paper, a scientist and a philosopher propose that insects have the capacity for consciousness. To which you may reasonably respond, "So, what's new about that?"

Yes, it's fairly obvious to anyone watching a bee's waggle-dance that she knows what she's telling her sisters about where the best flowers are. But every acknowledgement from the scientific world that nonhuman animals are conscious beings is valuable. And especially interesting is that in his New York Times article about this, science correspondent James Gorman also writes about another paper, one in which two other neuroscientists are proposing "that consciousness is nearly ubiquitous in different degrees, and can be present even in nonliving arrangements of matter, to varying degrees."

This is, of course, essentially what people believed for thousands of years before human exceptionalism took over and replaced panpsychism, as it's known, with the illogical notion that only we humans are conscious and that the other animals just operate off blind instinct. 

Read Do Honeybees Feel? Scientists Are Entertaining the Idea


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