Freezing Conditions Lead to a Temporary Ban on Wildfowl Hunting

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Freezing Conditions Lead to a Temporary Ban on Wildfowl Hunting

From News.BBC.co.uk

Birds covered by the order include coot, tufted duck, gadwall, goldeneye, Canada geese, greylag and pink-footed goose, mallard, moorhen, pintail, golden plover, pochard, shoveler, common snipe, teal, wigeon and woodcock.

Environment Minister Roseanna Cunningham has announced that the shooting of certain species will be prohibited from Tuesday (01/04/09). The Scottish government has enforced a law which protects birds in severe weather.

The British Association for Shooting and Conservation said it was the first suspension of its kind for 13 years.

Scottish Natural Heritage advised the government that species such as ducks, geese and shore waders were unable to feed in the current freezing conditions, threatening the birds' natural survival.

Wind farms

The suspension, brought into force under Section 2 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, prohibits the shooting of birds from 5 January. It could last for 14 days but will be reviewed after seven days.

Birds covered by the order include coot, tufted duck, gadwall, goldeneye, Canada geese, greylag and pink-footed goose, mallard, moorhen, pintail, golden plover, pochard, shoveler, common snipe, teal, wigeon and woodcock.

Meanwhile, scientists have published evidence that some upland bird populations are being affected by wind farms.

After studying the populations of 12 species at a dozen wind farms in Scotland and northern England, they found evidence of reduced breeding density among more than half of them.

Buzzards, red grouse, curlews and golden plovers, were among the birds which seemed to be worst affected.

The RSPB said it did not oppose wind farms but wanted them to be sited away from migration areas and places where birds feed and breed.