"Gruesome Twelfth" marks start of grouse shooting season

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"Gruesome Twelfth" marks start of grouse shooting season

[Ed. Note: From a recent YouGov poll in the U.K.: "Less than on in ten people think shooting live animals is 'totally acceptable.'"]

From League Against Cruel Sports
August 2011

The League Against Cruel Sports highlighted polling by YouGov which found that just 9% of the public think shooting animals for sport is ‘totally acceptable’, whilst more than sixty per-cent think it is unacceptable.

Less than one in ten people think shooting live animals is ‘totally acceptable’

As shooting fanatics take to the moors in Scotland and the north of England for the traditional start of the grouse shooting season on Friday, August 12, an animal welfare charity has described the ‘Glorious Twelfth’ as a ‘gruesome spectacle of animal abuse’.

The League Against Cruel Sports highlighted polling by YouGov which found that just 9% of the public think shooting animals for sport is ‘totally acceptable’, whilst more than sixty per-cent think it is unacceptable.

“From now until December, it’s perfectly legal to take a lethal firearm into the countryside and blast away at red grouse,” said Joe Duckworth, chief executive of the League. “The public think this is grotesque and would prefer the grouse to stay where it belongs, on moors and bottles of whisky.”

Mr Duckworth refuted claims that grouse shooting was important to the rural economy. “If this bloodsport were banned, the people who pay many thousands for the right to blast wildlife from the skies wouldn’t simply stop spending their money. It would be spent elsewhere in the economy,” he said. “Figures bandied about by the shooting lobby of the value of their sport to the economy are hugely over inflated and suggest the contribution to rural economies is far greater than it actually is.”

“The sanitised films produced by the shooting industry attempt to show shooting as a wholesome sport. They don’t show you the thousands of birds shot and injured but not killed, they don’t show you the inebriated shooters taking pot shots at these beautiful birds, and they don’t show you the horrors of snaring and other predator control used to protect game stocks,” added Mr Duckworth.