Sanctuary Secured for Azopharma Lab's Beagles and Monkeys

From all-creatures.org
Animal Rights Articles

Moo-ving people toward compassionate living

Visit our Home Page
Write us with your comments

Sanctuary Secured for Azopharma Lab's Beagles and Monkeys

[Ed. Note: Also read 55 Macaque Monkeys Find Refuge as Advocates Rush to Collaborate and Construct Living Spaces.]

By Camille Hankins, Win Animal Rights (WAR)

On June 1, 2010, Win Animal Rights launched Operation: Agitate to Liberate to free the 125 beagles and 55 monkeys endangered by the closure of Azopharma, owner of Oxford, NJ based Aniclin Preclinical Services.

We are pleased to announce that 30 days after the commencement of our campaign, and after having overcome all obstacles and objections, we are declaring victory.

On June 30, 2010, a Missouri court issued an order allowing the release of all the Azopharma/AniClin animals to sanctuaries and foster homes.

==========

Beagles from AniClin Test Lab to be Put Up for Adoption

By Jake Remaly on July 2nd, 2010 on Madison.InJersey.com

Thirty beagles from a now-closed testing laboratory in Warren County were taken to St. Hubert's Animal Welfare Center on Woodland Avenue on Friday afternoon so they can be adopted.

Because the beagles were released just before Independence Day, they're being named after signers of the Declaration of Independence, including Whipple, Adams and Franklin, St. Hubert's President Heather Cammisa said.

The company in charge of the testing facility's assets asked St. Hubert's to respond to the dogs and find them homes, the animal shelter said.

The dogs should be up for adoption at the end of next week, Cammisa said.

The dogs came from AniClin Preclinical Services in Oxford, Warren County, which closed a few months ago and was in bankruptcy court.

Advocacy group Win Animal Rights sent online notices in early June asking people to call the company in charge of AniClin's assets, MorrisAnderson, to arrange safe homes for the AniClin animals -- roughly 130 beagles and 55 monkeys, the group said.

"It's a very unusual situation and it's not anything that I've experience in 25 years of activism,'' Camille Hankins of Win Animal Rights said.

Cammisa said she was told by former AniClin employees, who helped load the beagles in crates for transport, that all but one of the beagles were "naive,'' meaning they had never been used for testing. The one beagle that had been used in testing is not expected to have any health problems, Cammisa said.

The adoption effort in New Jersey involves St. Hubert's and four other animal rescue groups: Mount Pleasant Animal Shelter in East Hanover, Noah's Ark in Ledgewood, Monmouth County SPCA in Eatontown and Animal Alliance in Lambertville.

At St. Hubert's, the beagles received veterinary exams and will be spayed and neutered before being put up for adoption, Cammisa said. Beagles are small to medium in size with a keen sense of smell and strong tracking instincts, and are known as good family pets and companions.

Mary Storella of Madison, a member of the St. Hubert's Board of Trustees, has decided to adopt one of the beagles, Franklin.

Franklin "seemed kind of shy in the cage, but now that he's out of the cage he seems kind of perky,'' she said.

For more information about when the dogs will be available for adoption visit http://www.sthuberts.org.