Sheep Need Your Help
An Animal Rights Article from All-Creatures.org

FROM

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA)
July 2014

[Ed. Note: Please read Sheep Thrills and Sexism: Another Reason Not to Wear Wool]

From being roughly handled and having their skin torn open by shearers more concerned with their quota than an animal's suffering to being crowded by the thousands onto massive, filthy ships that will carry them to ports in Africa and the Middle East, where their throats will be slit in front of other terrified animals, the abuse that Australian sheep endure is heartbreaking.

Watch graphic reality: International Exposé: Sheep Killed, Punched, Stomped on, and Cut for Wool

For the millions of gentle sheep born on Australian wool farms, almost every facet of their lives will be filled with misery, abuse, fear and illness, and many will experience a violent, painful death.

 sheep lamb We Animals
Image from Jo-Anne McArthur /
We Animals

From being roughly handled and having their skin torn open by shearers more concerned with their quota than an animal's suffering to being crowded by the thousands onto massive, filthy ships that will carry them to ports in Africa and the Middle East, where their throats will be slit in front of other terrified animals, the abuse that Australian sheep endure is heartbreaking.

While recent PETA US investigations of the shearing industry have drawn international attention to the misery that goes into every strand of wool, the live-export trade is perhaps the most disturbing and seldom seen part of the Australian sheep industry, which is built on the suffering of millions of lambs and sheep every year.

Your donation today will be put to work immediately to help us expose – and stop – some of the most horrific cruelty to these and other abused animals.

Sheep are intelligent, sensitive animals who have been shown to have a capacity for advanced learning. Studies reveal that they are adaptable animals who can map out their surroundings mentally and may even be able to plan ahead. They can identify flock members from photographs, and they can learn to overcome huge obstacles. But once farmers deem them no longer useful as wool producers, many sheep once used for wool face horrific suffering in the live-export trade.

In live export, animals are often transported by lorry for days without a bite of food or drop of water, shifted from the paddocks they once called home to noisy ports, where they are separated from their families and loaded onto huge, multi-tiered ships that will carry them to their deaths. Bound for the Middle East or North Africa, these open-deck ships are crammed full of terrified animals who are forced to live amidst their own filth, sometimes for weeks on end. Many die en route: some are trampled to death, and others perish slowly from illness spread by the filthy and severely crowded conditions or because they cannot identify the pellets they are given as food, having lived only on grass.

Those who somehow survive this journey end up in abattoirs. Some of the gruesome video footage from these places is extremely difficult to watch: the animals run about in a blind panic as they see other sheep who are being thrown to the ground and are having their throats cut in front of them. After their turn comes, they're flung onto a pile of bodies and left to bleed to death slowly.

No animal should ever experience the terror, misery and intense pain that so many victims of the Australian wool industry endure. Will you help sheep, lambs and all animals by donating online today?

With your help, we will be able to strengthen our work to draw attention to and halt abuses such as those I've described here. Whether we're pressuring decision-makers, meeting with retailers and designers, building awareness through publicity and demonstrations or exposing the findings of undercover investigations that delve into the horrors of the wool industry, PETA will tackle this issue diligently. But there is much work to be done, and we need your help as we forge ahead to protect sheep and other animals.


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