Where Will I Get My Protein?

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We began this archive as a means of assisting our visitors in answering many of their health and diet questions, and in encouraging them to take a pro-active part in their own health.  We believe the articles and information contained herein are true, but are not presenting them as advice.  We, personally, have found that a whole food vegan diet has helped our own health, and simply wish to share with others the things we have found.   Each of us must make our own decisions, for it's our own body.  If you have a health problem, see your own physician.


Where Will I Get My Protein?

From NotMilk.com

Race horses run fast. No doubt, they must sneak out of their stalls at night and visit Burger King for Whopper treats and shakes.

Race horses could not possibly grow powerful muscles and bones to support their weight without their daily portions of cow's milk and cow flesh.

Actually, horses love grains, and rarely say neigh to carrots.

Does being vegetarian work for elite athletes? Unfortunately, it does not. As evidence that vegetarians make poor athletes, I submit the names of seven vegetarians who never made it big in professional sports:

Henry Aaron, Billie Jean King, Carl Lewis, Martina Navratilova, Paavo Nurmi, Bill Walton, and Dave Scott, six-time winner of the Ironman Triathlon.

Elephants are the true kings of the jungle. Beware, water buffalo and zebras. Elephants are voracious eaters. No beast of the jungle is safe in the presence of a starving elephant. Elephants must eat meat. Otherwise, how could one explain such incredibly strong muscles? Without cheese, elephants would suffer from broken bones, unable to hold their enormous weight.

Mark Haub and a group of scientists at Kansas State University performed a study that was designed to test the effects of different dietary protein sources on muscle size in older men.

I spoke with Mark in early April, 2003 after reading the abstract of his study, and by tax day, had an original copy.

The conclusion of the study revealed that meat eaters and vegetarians have no differences in muscle mass or composition after 12 weeks of working out in a gym. Haub's conclusion is that diet plays no role in muscle size.

But wait a second. Having the complete study allowed me to read their experimental protocol. The vegetarian group ate a diet rich in milk and dairy products.

Essentialy, their protein intake was no different than the meat eaters. Why? Milk is called "liquid meat." Milk and cheese contain proteins identical to red meat. It is no wonder that there was no discernable difference between the two groups. For all practical purposes, the two groups ate a diet more similar than different.

Animal proteins have been linked to heart disease by William Castelli, senior investigator of the largest clinical heart study in history, the Framingham Study. According to real science, animal protein causes heart disease.

Animal proteins have also been linked to osteoporosis. Ingestion of sulfur-containing amino acids causes an acid condition in the bloodstream which the body neutralizes by leeching calcium from bones. See:

Animal proteins contain greater amounts of methionine than do plant proteins. Milk is liquid meat, and dairy products contain high levels of methionine, which has sulfur as its center atom. The sulfur converts to sulfates and causes an acid condition in the blood that results in cellular destruction. Imagine the smell of rotten eggs infusing into every cell and muscle fiber in your body. Dr. Haub's study included two groups eating essentiually the same diet. It was not a study. It was a confirmation.

Should the research study ever be redesigned or replicated, one group should consist of vegans who eat no meat or dairy products.