veggies.jpg (6769 bytes)fruitbowl.jpg (6391 bytes)Nutrition and Renal Disease
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We began this archive as a means of assisting our visitors in answering many of their health and diet questions, and in encouraging them to take a pro-active part in their own health.  We believe the articles and information contained herein are true, but are not presenting them as advice.  We, personally, have found that a whole food vegan diet has helped our own health, and simply wish to share with others the things we have found.   Each of us must make our own decisions, for it's our own body.  If you have a health problem, see your own physician.


Nutrition and Renal Disease
www.pcrm.org

Diet in Acute Renal Failure

Diet plays a critical role in the care of patients with acute renal failure. Clinicians should plan diets with an eye toward the possibility of uremia, metabolic acidosis, fluid and electrolyte imbalances, infection, and tissue destruction. Nutritional support of dialysis will be discussed below in the section on chronic renal failure.

Protein: A low-protein diet (0.5-0.6 grams per kilogram) is recommended initially. Protein may be increased in the diet as the glomerular filtration rate increases to normal. If dialysis is initiated, the protein level may be increased to 1.0-1.5 grams per kilogram per day if necessary to compensate for protein losses in the dialysate.

Calories: Calorie needs are generally elevated (35-50 kilocalories per kilogram) in order to provide positive nitrogen balance under stressful conditions. As protein is usually quite restricted, calorie needs may be met by providing greater amounts of carbohydrate and fat in the diet.

Sodium and Fluid: Sodium is restricted depending on urinary excretion, edema, serum sodium levels, and dialysis needs. During the oliguric phase, sodium may be restricted to 500-1000 milligrams per day, and fluid requirements are based on replacing losses via urine, vomitus, and diarrhea, plus approximately 500 milliliters per day.

Potassium: Potassium requirements vary depending on hemodynamic status and the degree of hypermetabolism due to stress, infection, or fever. High potassium levels are treated by dialysis or with kayexalate, an exchange resin which substitutes sodium for potassium in the gastrointestinal tract. During the oliguric phase, potassium may be restricted to 1,000 milligrams per day.3

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