ftshl-wildrosesmp8-sm.jpg (9176 bytes)Morrow Honeysuckle (Lonicera morrowii) also called Morrow's Honeysuckle
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Flowering Trees, Bushes and Shrubs of Sleepy Hollow Lake
Morrow Honeysuckle (Lonicera morrowii) also called Morrow's Honeysuckle

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 01)  The morrow honeysuckle has white flowers that bloom in May.  The flowers grow from the leaf axils in pairs, and as the leaves grow opposite one another, there are usually two pairs of flowers growing together, as seen in this photo.

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 01a)  Each flower of the morrow honeysuckle has 5 petals, 5 stamens, and 1 pistil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 02)  Within a few days of blooming the white morrow honeysuckle flower petals begin to turn yellow.  We believe this begins to happen when the seeds are fertilized, but have not seen any confirmation of this theory in the literature.

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 02a)  When the fertilized seeds swell the ovaries, the yellow flower petals fall off, leaving the green, unripe fruit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 03)  Morrow honeysuckle are native to Japan and Korea, and are considered an invasive species in many areas because they have a tendency to crowd out native species.  They can grow to heights of 8-15 feet.

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 04)  This is another look at the aging yellow flowers of the morrow honeysuckle.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 04a)  In this close up look at a pair of aging morrow honeysuckle flowers, we can see the swelling ovaries, and the shriveled yellow petals.  We have also noticed that once the morrow honeysuckle flowers turn yellow, they no longer seem to attract bees.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 05)  When a person casually looks at a morrow honeysuckle, it can easily look like the bush has yellow flowers.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 05a)  Even by looking a little closer, a casual observer may miss the fact that these yellow morrow honeysuckle flowers are really the aging and shriveled white flowers.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 06)  Even by looking this closely at an aging morrow honeysuckle flower, a casual observer could think that these are naturally growing yellow flowers.
 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 06a)  It is only when we recognize that the pollen has dried up and turned brown that we come to understand that this is not a flower with long yellow petals, but an aging and drying up white flower of the morrow honeysuckle.

 

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 07)  This is another look at the aging, once white, flowers of the morrow honeysuckle.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 08)  When the next springtime rolls around, and we look at the morrow honeysuckle bush again, we realize that it really does have white flowers.
 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 08a)  In this bee's eye view of a pair of morrow honeysuckle flowers, we can see the fresh and alive petals, stamens, and pistil of each flower.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 09)  This is another look at at pair of morrow honeysuckle flowers.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 10)  In this photos of the end of a morrow honeysuckle branch, we can see four pairs of flower buds that are just ready to open.  To the far left of the photo, we can see part of a flower that has already opened.

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 10a)  In this close up photo, we can see that there are only two sepals for each pair of morrow honeysuckle flower buds.  In this photo, we also have a clear view of the way the flower stems grow from the leaf axils.
 

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 11)  This is another view of 4 pairs of morrow honeysuckle flower buds.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 11a)  In this close up photo of the terminal end (right side of photo) of the morrow honeysuckle branch, we can see the green sprout (partly hidden under a leaf) of the new growth of the branch and leaves.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 12)  The flowers and buds of a morrow honeysuckle bush grace a spring day.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 13)  This is another look at some of the morrow honeysuckle flowers and buds.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 13a)  In this close up view of a morrow honeysuckle, we can see another way of identifying this species.  Morrow honeysuckle leaves have very short fuzzy hairs on the leaves, some of which can be seen on the leaf edges against the dark background of this photo.
 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 14)  This is another look at some of the flowers and buds on a morrow honeysuckle bush.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 14a)  This is a close up look at a pair of morrow honeysuckle flower buds and the adjacent leaf.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 15)  This is another look at a cluster of morrow honeysuckle flowers.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 15a)  In this close up photo of a few pairs of morrow honeysuckle flowers, we have a good side view of the flowers' ovary, petals, stamens and pistil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 16)  This is another look at a blooming morrow honeysuckle bush.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 16a)  This is a bright sun-lit view of a cluster of morrow honeysuckle flowers.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 17)  In this close up view of the underside of a morrow honeysuckle leaf, we can see the tiny fuzzy hairs that grow along the leaf veins and along the margin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 18)  In this photo, we tried to focus in on a few of the leaf veins and their hairs, which are clearer toward the center of the photo.

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 19)  On this morrow honeysuckle branch we can see three twin pairs of unripe fruit.  As the fruit matures, it turns red.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 19a)  This is a closer look at two pairs of unripe fruit on a morrow honeysuckle branch, which is highlighted by the setting sun and shadows.
 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 19b)  In this photo of the morrow honeysuckle unripe fruit, we can see that one fruit of the lower right pair has not developed as much as the others.
 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 20)  This is another look at some of the morrow honeysuckle developing fruit.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 20a)  We also found it interesting that one of these eight morrow honeysuckle fruit also has not properly developed.  In all, it appears that about 90% of all the fruit does properly develop.

 

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 21)  This is another look at some of the morrow honeysuckle developing fruit.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 21a)  This is a close up look at some of the morrow honeysuckle fruit.  The top of the fruit (dark end) is where the flower had bloomed.
 

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 22)  As the fruit of the morrow honeysuckle ripens, it becomes bright red.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 22a)  This is a closer look at some of the morrow honeysuckle's ripening fruit.
 

 

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 23)  This is another look at the ripening fruit of the morrow honeysuckle.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 23a)  In this closer look at the morrow honeysuckle, we can see how the flower/fruit stem grows from the leaf axils, the hairy edges of the leaves, and the ripening fruit.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 24)  This is another look at the ripening fruit of the morrow honeysuckle.

 

 

 

 

(Honeysuckle, Morrow - 24a)  This is another close up look at the ripening fruit of the morrow honeysuckle.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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