California Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act has become law!
Alternatives to Animal Testing, Experimentation and Dissection - An Animal Rights Article from All-Creatures.org

FROM

Physicians Committee
September 2018

draize tested rabbit
Rabbit victim of the infamous "Draize Test"...

Starting January 1, 2020, any cosmetics tested on animals, or that contain ingredients tested on animals, will not be allowed to be sold in California.

The California Cruelty-Free Cosmetics Act, SB 1249, has been signed into law by California Governor Jerry Brown!

First and foremost, thank you—we cannot thank you enough. Over the past eight months, thousands of PCRM members contacted their state representatives and the governor, attended hearings, donated to the cause, and encouraged friends to get active. You showed that California will not stand for cruelty in its products.

Starting Jan. 1, 2020, any cosmetics tested on animals, or that contain ingredients tested on animals, will not be allowed to be sold in California, with some exceptions for direct regulatory requirements.

All cosmetics and ingredients must be tested using nonanimal methods. This law will affect not only California but all cosmetics sold across the United States. And it is thanks to you.

Again, thank you for your dedication to protecting animals by supporting this historic legislation.


FYI from Wikipedia: The Draize Test is an acute toxicity test devised in 1944 by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) toxicologists John H. Draize and Jacob M. Spines. Initially used for testing cosmetics, the procedure involves applying 0.5mL or 0.5g of a test substance to the eye or skin of a restrained, conscious animal, and then leaving it for set amount of time before rinsing it out and recording its effects. The animals are observed for up to 14 days for signs of erythema and edema in the skin test, and redness, swelling, discharge, ulceration, hemorrhaging, cloudiness, or blindness in the tested eye. The test subject is commonly an albino rabbit, though other species are used too, including dogs. The animals are euthanized after testing if the test renders irreversible damage to the eye or skin. Animals may be re-used for testing purposes if the product tested causes no permanent damage. Animals are typically reused after a "wash out" period during which all traces of the tested product are allowed to disperse from the test site.


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