Tenacious Turkeys
Animal Stories from All-Creatures.org

FROM Indraloka Animal Sanctuary
January 2020

Benjamin Franklin once suggested that the turkey is a better candidate for the national bird than the bald eagle.

Turkey Maxene
Maxene

Did you know?...

Turkeys are beautifully strong and social birds, "birds of courage," as Benjamin Franklin called them. They are often referred to as "gobblers," though only male turkeys, called toms, make that distinctive sound. And it's a sound that can be heard up to a mile away on a quiet day! Not that they need the volume that badly; turkeys have excellent hearing. Though they can see for almost 100 yards, and in color, they do neither of these things well at night.

While many people know that the red, fleshy skin under turkeys' chins is called a wattle, few know that the appendage protruding from their faces is called a snood. If you really want to win turkey trivia, remember that the fleshy growth around a turkey's head and neck is called a caruncle.

Benjamin Franklin once suggested that the turkey is a better candidate for the national bird than the bald eagle. He favored the turkey because it is a native of North America, adding that the protective turkey would surely attack any red-coated British soldier entering a colonist's farm.

Did you know that Indraloka has three recently rescued turkeys? They are Maxene, Patty, and LaVerne after the Andrews Sisters of "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" fame. This is not only because we are big boogie woogie fans, but primarily because these ladies really do sing--and kee-kee, yelp, and purr--together!

Turkey Patty
Patty

Turkey LaVerne
LaVerne


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