William Shakespeare

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William Shakespeare Ė 20 March 2009

For today Iíve chosen this well-known poem from a book of verse published in 1932.

When, in Disgrace with Fortune and Men's Eyes
Sonnet 29
William Shakespeare

When, in disgrace with fortune and menís eyes,
I all alone beweep my outcast state,
And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,
And look upon myself, and curse my fate,
Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
Featured like him, like him with friends possessed,
Desiring this manís art, and that manís scope,
With what I most enjoy contented least;
Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,
Haply I think on thee, and then my state,
Like to the lark at break of day arising
From sullen earth, sings hymns at heavenís gate;
For thy sweet love remembered such wealth brings
That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

For a large collection of poetry and stories, visit:
http://www.all-creatures.org/poetrydir.html
 


"Joyful Curmudgeon"
An oxymoron?
No! I see all the beauty of God's creation and I'm joyful.  At the same time, I see all the suffering and corruption going on in the world, and feel called to help expose and end it so that we may have true peace and compassion.

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