THE HUNTER BOUNTY: THE QUICKER PICKER UPPER

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THE HUNTER BOUNTY: THE QUICKER PICKER UPPER
By Mark Edgemon

The United States was infested with various types of scoundrels during President Ulysses S. Grant's administration, namely railroad robber barons (People who made an unfair profit by swindling people out of their land and selling it to the railroad companies) and racists people who banned together to form organizations like the Klu Klux Klan, to deny black americans their civil rights granted to them by the fourteenth and fifteenth admendments to the constitution.

To combat these problems, President Grant appointed Amos T. Akerman to the office of United States Attorney General in June of 1970. He took office as the head of the newly formed Justice Department and began the departments first investigative unit, which eventually became the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Attorney General Akerman also instituted the first most wanted list, the first edition including 30 names of hardened criminals, including mostly con artists and hustlers who took unfair advantage of families, who were settling the western lands.

Having no one to spare from his department, Attorney General Akerman appointed the Chief Accountant of the United States Treasury, Virgil Pebo Hunter to oversee the Department of United States Bounty Hunters, to track down outlaws and bring them in dead or alive.

Only weighing a little over 100 pounds and only 5 foot six inches tall and having never fired a gun in his life, Virgil knew he would have to out think the criminals he would need to bring in.

He discovered an old mining town in Nevada and disguised himself as a land speculator with a lot of cash looking for a deal. He leaked stories to the press about his interest in the abandoned mining town and then waited for the flood of con men that would then look him up.

Soon enough, the town was full of every confidence man and dirty rotten scoundrel that the nation had to offer. As he expected, all thirty of the Nation's Most Wanted were there as well as another hundred assorted types of swindlers, most of them known to the Attorney General's office.

He used the town's saloon as a meeting place and gathered the criminal element there to meet with him. They had expected to be informed of the land speculating plan and so they packed themselves into the building until there was standing room only.

Just as the meeting was about to start, Virgil slipped out the back and pumped sleeping gas into the building. A few minutes later, everyone inside was asleep.

He loaded the unconscience criminals into 6 wagons, each attached to the other and took them to Virginia City, shoving them into the sheriff's jail, until he wired Washington for reinforcements.

Weeks later, he received the bounty cash rewards on each of the most wanted and the other assorted criminals, which came to eighty thousand dollars. The entire operation took less than a month.

Virgil Hunter retired from the Treasury and settled in Boston, where he raised a family and started a new business. Although successful, he was glad to be out of the bounty hunter business. It wasn't a safe business to be in. All he worried about now was being careful not to be bit by a different type of snake. You see, he opened a medical supply company, which provided snake venum for use in medicines. Business was brisk. He was now milking a hundred snakes a day.

Copyright 2008 Mark Edgemon

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