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Newsletter - Animal Writes sm
17 November 1999 Issue

Radio Appeal

Here is a Thanksgiving letter FARM sent to 850 radio news directors and talk shows. Please feel free to forward to your own local radio stations.

* * * * *

Dear Producer:

With profound apologies to David Letterman, here are the latest Top Ten reasons to skip the turkey on Thanksgiving:

10. You'll be able to dance circles around bloated, cholesterol-dazed Uncle Ned.
9. You won't have to call the Poultry Hot Line for safety instructions.
8. Fruits and vegetables don't carry government warning labels.
7. You won't wonder what the turkey died of.
6. You are what you eat. Who wants to be a "butterball"?
5. Commercial turkeys are too fat to have sex. It could happen to you.
4. Giblets - the heart, liver, gizzard, neck, wing, and the like, of a fowl.
3. Animal rights activists will serenade you.
2. Rush Limbaugh won't invite himself over.
1. You won't be sending a mixed message to your kids.

All right, so it's a gimmick to get your attention. What's really "cool" is that millions of vegetarians across the US will be observing this Thanksgiving without a turkey.

In homes, churches, community centers, and hotel ballrooms across the US, they will replace the wretched carcass of the sacrificial turkey with a guilt-free, wholesome, delicious spread. The bill of fare may include lentil or nut roast, stuffed squash, corn chowder or chestnut soup, candied yams, pumpkin or pecan pie, and carrot cake.

(See www.vsdc.org/calendar.html#Thanksgiving.)

Plant-based eating is becoming increasingly popular as Americans discover the health, environmental, and ethical benefits of kicking the meat habit. More than 30 million Americans have explored meatless eating, and one in three teens thinks vegetarianism is "cool". Mainstream health advocacy groups are touting plant-based diets, and major food manufacturers and retailers are marketing meatless meals. The meat industry is in retreat, facing reduced government subsidies, stricter pollution standards, rising operating costs, and shrinking domestic markets. It's the stuff of an exciting, provocative interview.

What do vegetarians eat on Thanksgiving? How do they handle family situations? How did the Thanksgiving turkey tradition get started? Why does a turkey receive a presidential pardon? Why do 40 million turkeys never reach the slaughterhouse? Why do turkey carcasses carry government warning labels? Why is US turkey production dropping? So now, what do I eat? What events are planned in my area?

And here are a few of the many articulate, entertaining speakers available:

* Casey Kasem, popular radio and television host
* Howard Lyman, cattle rancher turned vegetarian activist, author of Mad Cowboy
* Neal Barnard, MD, physician, author of Food for Life and Eat Right, Live Longer
* Karen Davis, PhD, author of Prisoned Chickens, Poisoned Eggs and Instead of Chicken
* Alex Hershaft, PhD, founder of FARM and the Great American Meatout

A quick call to me at 808-575-7694 will get you a guest, a date, and a list of provocative questions. You and your listeners will be forever grateful, I promise.

Sincerely, Laurelee Blanchard, Director of Communications

Source: FARM - 1-888-ASK FARM, www.farmusa.org
Email: Farmusa@erols.com

Go on to Fur Free Friday
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