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Fruit
Ingredients Descriptions and Photos

From all-creatures.org
Vegan - Vegetarian Recipe Book
How Mary and Frank and Friends Eat

"We are dedicated to cruelty-free living through a vegetarian - vegan lifestyle.
Let no animal suffer or die that we may live!"

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Ingredients Descriptions and Photos
Fruit

Note: Fruits such as tomatoes and eggplant are included with vegetables because they are more often considered and eaten as vegetables.
(click on the photos or links to enlarge photos and descriptions)

2 (Apples, Arkansas Black)  Arkansas black apples really aren't black, but rather a very dark red that looks almost black. They are also the most dense apple we have ever tried. They have a crisp sweet-tart taste, but to us, their denseness makes them less desirable as an eating apple; however, Arkansas black apples are great for cooking, because they hold their shape. We found these apples in a farm store, but have never seem them in a supermarket. Arkansas black apples, a variety of winesap, were first produced in Arkansas in 1870. We could not find any specific nutritional information for for Arkansas black apples and have therefore included a composite apple nutritional chart.
2 (Apples, Cameo)  We were first introduced to cameo apples in the early Fall of 2006 at a local farm store.  We have not seen these apples in any supermarket in our area. Cameo apples are large, crisp, and have a sweet-tart flavor, and make a great eating apple.  Cameo apples originally came from a single, lone tree which was found to be growing amidst an orchard full of Red Delicious apples in Dryden, Washington, in the mid 1980s.  Today they are also grown in New York State.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for cameo apples, so we've included only general apple nutritional information.
2 (Apples, Crispin)  Crispin, or Matsu, apples are among the larger of the eating apples.  As the name implies, they are crisp and slightly tart.  Aged Crispin apples have a tendency to get slightly "mealy" and somewhat sweeter.  It is best to buy these apples very soon after harvesting in the autumn.
2 (Apples, Fuji)  Fuji apples are an excellent eating apple with a crisp sweet flavor, and have excellent keeping qualities.  They were developed  by crossing a Ralls Janet apple with a Red Delicious apple.  They have a mottled red skin over a yellow background; the redder the skin, the more direct sunlight the apple was exposed to while growing.  We could not find specific nutritional information for this variety, but have included general nutritional information on apples.  To enlarge the photo and see the nutritional chart, click on the photo or link.
2 (Apples - Gala)  Gala apples are sweet, like a red delicious apple, and crispy.  They are an excellent eating apple.  Like any other apple variety, they are best if purchased soon after harvesting.  Select gala apples that are firm and free of bruises and blemishes.
2 (Apples, Geneva Early)  As the name implies, Geneva early apples mature early in the season.  We purchased these on July 11th at a local farm store, making them one of the earliest ripening apples.  They have a good eating quality.  Technically, the Geneva Early apple originated from a 'Quinte' x 'Julyred' cross made in 1964. Initially identified as N.Y. 444, 'Geneva Early' was selected in July 1973 from a population of 173 seedlings grown from this cross.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for cameo apples, so we've included only general apple nutritional information.
2 (Apples, Ginger Gold)  Ginger gold apples are a relatively new variety of early apples, which are now being sold in supermarkets as well as farm stores. They are sweet and crisp when newly harvested in late summer and early fall.  When they are placed in storage prior to sale, or are left unrefrigerated, some of the crispness may be lost.  They are an excellent eating apple. Choose ginger gold apples that are smooth-skinned, firm, and free of bruises or other defects.  We could not find any nutritional data specifically for this variety, but have included a chart for a composite of many different apples.
2 (Apples, Harrell's Red)  We saw these Harrell's Red apples at a farm store.  This was the first and only place we have seen them, and decided to try them.  They are crisp and have a good flavor.  We have not been able to find any information about them, and suspect that it's a newly developed variety.
2 (Apples, Honeycrisp)  We consider the honeycrisp apple to be an excellent eating and cooking apple.  They are crisp with a sweet-tart flavor.  Honeycrisp apples were produced from a cross of Macoun and Honeygold apples.  The skin color is 60 to 90 percent distinctive mottled red over a yellow background. A nearly solid red coloration develops only if the fruit is well exposed to the sun (the variation in color can be seen in the photo).  In the red portion of the skin are small greenish-yellow dots.  We could not find specific nutritional information for this variety, but have included general nutritional information on apples. To enlarge the photo and see the nutritional chart, click on the photo or link.
2 (Apples, Law Rome)  Law Rome apples are a Fall variety that is semi-sweet and mostly promoted as a cooking apple.  They can can also be eaten raw, but they don't have the crispness of most eating apples.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for cameo apples, so we've included only general apple nutritional information.
2 (Apples, Macoun)  The Macoun apple is a crisp, tart-sweet delicious eating apple.  Macoun (sometimes pronounced "McCowan" or "Macoon") was developed at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, as a cross between the McIntosh and Jersey Black varieties, by R. Wellington. It was named after Canadian fruit grower W.T. Macoun, it was first introduced in 1923, and has been regarded as one of the finest eating apples in the Northeast. Macouns are also very popular at roadside stands and pick-your-own farms. Availability is generally October through November. Aside from its short season of availability, the popularity of the apple is somewhat compromised by the problems it gives orchardists. The Macoun has a short stem, and there is a tendency for the apple to push itself off the branch as the fruit matures; also, the Macoun tends not to produce reliable crops each year, with a good harvest followed by a sparser one, as a result, we have only found Macoun apples for sale at farm stands.  To enlarge the photo and see the nutritional chart, click on the photo or link.
2 (Apples, Opalescent)  Opalescent Apples are described as an American antique gem that was developed around 1880, and which still thrills the taste buds with its tart sweet tasting crispness.  When we saw bags of them at a farm store in 2010, we thought they were a new variety, because we didn't remember ever seeing them before. We're very happy we bought them, because they're a great tasting apple. They're also a good baking apple with a wonderful aroma. Opalescent apples don't bruise easily, they store well, and they're one of the few early apples that are hard and juicy when fully ripe. We could not find any specific nutritional information for opalescent apples, so we included the nutritional chart for apples in general.
2 (Apples, Pink Lady® or Cripps)  Pink lady apples have been marketed as a premium eating apple, but a lesser quality pink lady is also marketed under the name "Cripps Pink".  Pink lady apples are crisp with a sweet-tart flavor, but the storage apples sold in supermarkets tend to lose their crispness due to lack of proper refrigeration. Pink Lady apples originally came from Australia, and is a cross between Golden Delicious and Lady Williams.  One of the interesting things we have observes with pink lady apples is that some of the apples have fine pink veining in parts of the whitish flesh of the apple.  According to Marcie Brandt, the "keeper" of the trademark, the correct name is Pink Lady® brand, which is not a variety; however, we have seen them sold as a variety in the markets, and listed as such on the internet. Confused? So are we.  Whatever their correct name is, they are good to eat.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for Pink Lady® or Cripps apples, so we've included only general apple nutritional information.
2 (Apples, Red Delicious)  Red delicious apples are a sweet, medium firm, eating variety.  They soften on cooking and are not a good choice for pies, but they are acceptable for recipes such as apple crisp.  The texture of red delicious apples becomes "mealy" with storage.  They are best purchased in season.  When buying at other times of the year, choose apples that are firm and free of wrinkles.  See the nutritional chart by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Apples, Royal Gala)  Royal Gala apples were named in honor of Queen Elizabeth II.  The Royal Gala is a cross between a Golden Delicious and an orange Pippin. With a crisp and aromatically sweet juicy flesh, this apple has pinkish-orange stripes over a yellow flesh and is usually eaten fresh. Royal Gala apples were originally developed in New Zealand in 1960, and later came to North America. We could not find any specific nutritional information for Royal Gala apples, so we included the nutritional chart for apples in general.
2 (Apples, Tydeman)  Tydeman apples are tart, crisp (when fresh picked), early eating and cooking apples that ripen in August.  They are also referred to as Tydeman's Red, and Tydeman's Early.  It is a cross between a Worcester Pearmain and Red McIntosh, and was developed in England in 1929.  Tydeman apples are not good storage apples, as they lose both their crispness and some of their flavor.  We have seen Tydeman apples only on sale in farm stores.  Like all early apples, they are best refrigerated immediately after purchasing.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for Tydeman apples so we have included average apple nutritional information.  To enlarge the photo and see the nutritional information, click on the photo or link.
2 (Apples, Vista Bella)  Vista Bella apples are tart, crisp (when fresh picked), early eating apples that ripen in late July and early August, and they are usually the first apple we see at the farm stores.  They are also sometimes referred to as "vistabella apples.  It is a cross between a July Red, Williams Early Red, and Starr apple, and was developed in New Jersey in 1934.  Vista Bella apples are not good storage apples, as they lose their crispness in about 3 days after picking.  We have seen Vista Bella apples only on sale in farm stores.  Like all early apples, they are best refrigerated immediately after purchasing.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for Vista Bella apples so we have included average apple nutritional information.  To enlarge the photo and see the nutritional information, click on the photo or link.
2 (Apples, Winesap)  The winesap apple, also called Stayman Winesap, has an old-fashioned (1870ish) tart, almost wine-like flavor that makes it the cider maker's first choice. If you like tart crisp apples, these are great. Winesap apples are mostly red, usually with a little bit of yellow or green lingering about, and they are great as a snack, in salads, or for baking. Winesap apples are one of the most popular choices for making apple sauce, tarts, pies, and cobblers, because they retain their flavor and bake so well. We could not find any specific nutritional information for for Winesap apples and have therefore included a composite apple nutritional chart.
Zestar Apples (Apples, Zestar®) Zestar® apples are one of the earliest maturing apples, and unlike most other early apples, the Zestar® has a crispy texture with a wonderful sweet-tart taste, and the crispiness lasts for a couple of weeks when refrigerated. They are a great eating apple, but unfortunately, we haven't seen them in any supermarkets. We bought ours at a farm store. Zestar® apples are as new variety that was developed by the University of Minnesota, as a hybridization of State Fair x MN 1691 apples, and introduced in 1999.
2 (Apricots)  The apricot is originally a native of eastern Asia, and is member of the Rose family.  From the color or these apricots and because they ripened early in the season, we believe that the apricots in this photo are a variety known as "Royal", which were developed in France.  Apricots will ripen on the kitchen counter, and can be stored for about a week in the refrigerator.  Select apricots are free of blemishes.  When they ripen, they are slightly soft to the touch.  See the nutritional chart by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Apricots - Dried)  The dried apricot halves in this photo have been sulphured during the drying process in order to preserve their color.  Unsulphured dried apricots (brownish colored) are available in health food stores and from food co-operatives.  Dried apricots are great for snacks.  See the nutritional chart by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Avocado)  Unlike most other fruits and vegetables, which are relatively low in calories, avocados are high in calories because of their mono-unsaturated fat content.  They can be cut in half and eaten out of the "shell", cut on salads, made into dips, or sliced and used in sandwiches.  Choose avocados that are firm or slightly soft to the touch, but free of depressions.  When avocados are ripe, they are slightly soft to the touch.  They will ripen on the kitchen countertop; and when ripe, they can be stored for a few days in the refrigerator.  To enlarge the photo and see the nutritional chart, click on the photo or link.
2 2 (Avocado, Haas)  In our opinion, the Haas avocado is the best tasting of all varieties; it is also the smallest. Unlike most other fruits and vegetables, which are relatively low in calories, avocados are high in calories because of their mono-unsaturated fat content.  They can be cut in half and eaten out of the "shell", cut on salads, made into dips, or sliced and used in sandwiches.  Choose avocados that are firm or slightly soft to the touch, but free of depressions.  When avocados are ripe, they are slightly soft to the touch.  They will ripen on the kitchen countertop; and when ripe, they can be stored for a few days in the refrigerator.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for Haas avocados, so we included a general chart. To enlarge the photo and see the nutritional chart, click on the photo or link.
2 (Bananas)  Bananas are a tropical fruit that grows on a plant that reaches a height of 10 to 25 feet.  The bananas are supported on a large heavy stem and grow with the individual stems facing downward.  Bananas are always picked green and ripen on the way to market.  When ripe, bananas lose their green color and begin to get small brown spots on their yellow skin.   The last remaining green color can be seen at the tips of the bananas in the photo.  See nutritional information chart by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Bananas, Nino)  Nino bananas, baby bananas, or finger bananas, as they are also called, look very similar to the common yellow bananas found in food markets, except these thin-skinned bananas are only 3-4 inches long. These bananas also ripen in a similar manner to the larger variety by developing brown spots on a yellow skin. The flesh has a more dense and creamy texture than standard bananas. Some sources claim they are much higher in calories than the standard banana, but our research disproves that: a single nino banana, with an average weight of 85 grams, has about 80 calories, derived from its 20 grams of carbohydrate (1 gram fiber and 13 grams sugar), 1 gram of protein, and 0 grams of fat; a similar weight of the flesh of a regular banana has 75 calories. We could not find any other nutritional information. The only drawback that we found to buying these bananas on a regular basis is that they sell for 2-3 times the price per pound of the standard yellow bananas, but the advantage is that they take up less space, and they contain less waste (skin weight).
- 2 (Bananas, Red)  Red bananas, which are grown in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia and the Americas, are smaller and plumper than yellow bananas. Red bananas should have a deep red, reddish purple, or maroon rind when ripe, and are best eaten when unbruised (as they get mushy) and slightly soft. The redder the fruit, the more carotene and the higher the vitamin C level. The ripe, raw red bananas have a flesh that is cream to light pink in color. They are also softer and somewhat sweeter than the yellow varieties, with a slight raspberry-banana flavor. As with yellow bananas, red bananas will ripen in a few days at room temperature and are best stored outside refrigeration, but we have found that once they are ripe they should be stored in the refrigerator to prevent spoiling. The main drawback to purchasing them on a regular basis is that they usually sell for premium prices of 2 to 3 times the price of yellow bananas, and to us, the flavor difference does not justify the price difference. We could not find any specific nutritional information for red bananas.
2 (Bananas, Saba or Cooking)  Saba or cooking bananas, a variety of bananas from the Philippines, are usually sold "green" or when the just begin to turn greenish-yellow, which means that the bananas are mostly starch, but if they are left out to ripen, as those in the photo above, they become sweet as the starch converts to sugar; however, they are not as sweet as the regular eating bananas. This is the reason that saba or cooking bananas are usually cooked in various recipes, much like plantains. In fact, saba or cooking bananas and plantains can be substituted for each other in any recipe. Saba or cooking bananas are about 1/2 the size of plantains. We could not find any specific nutritional information for saba or cooking bananas.
2 (Blueberries)  Fresh blueberries are only seasonally available at reasonable prices, so we buy a flat of plastic boxes, and wash and freeze most of them for later use (see photo).  Blueberries are great to eat fresh or frozen in fruit salads, on cereal, in muffins, oven cakes, and in many more tasty recipes.  Frozen blueberries can be stored in sealed containers in the freezer for several months.  To enlarge the photo and see the nutritional chart, click on the photo or link.
2 (Blueberries, Wild)  Wild blueberries are about 1/2 the size of the cultivated variety normally sold fresh in plastic boxes in the markets.  We have seen only frozen wild blueberries, which are easy to store in the freezer, where they are always ready for serving or adding to a recipe.  See the nutritional chart and enlarge the photo of the wild blueberries by click on the photo or link.
2 (Cantaloupe)  Cantaloupes are a type of musk melon.  Rich in carotenes, the inner flesh of the cantaloupe is sweet and juicy with a bright orange color.  Select cantaloupes that have a veined rind (avoid smooth ones) and that are yellowish or turning yellow (as pictured).  Cantaloupes are ripe when they become slightly soft and you can smell their aroma.  We enjoy cantaloupes in fruit smoothies, cut or sectioned, and in fruit platters and salads.  See the nutritional chart by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Cape Gooseberries)  We first say cape gooseberries on sale at a farm market where they were selling for $2.00 per pound.  We have never seen them on sale in any supermarket.  They are sweet green berries with a slight tang, something like grapes, and are covered with a loose fitting husk. It is believed to be a native of Peru and Chile, and later cultivated in the Cape of Good Hope, where it acquired it common English name of cape gooseberry.  According to the literature that we saw, the fruit gets even sweeter if allowed to ripen on the plant to a yellowish orange color.
2 (Cherries)  Cherries are a delicious sweet fruit with a limited season.  Cherries also bruise quite easily and develop soft spots if mishandled, so it is best to select cherries carefully.  Select firm, full colored cherries that are free of splits or other damage.  Green stems are also a good indication of freshness.  Cherries can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a week.  The most widely grown variety of red cherry is the Bing.   Another less grown red cherry variety is the Lambert, which are harvested about a week after the Bing.  A caution: cherries often have a higher pesticide residue than most other fruits, so it is best to thoroughly wash them immediately before eating.  To enlarge the photo and see the nutritional chart, click on the photo or link.
2 (Clementines)  Clementines are really sweet, miniature (usually seedless) mandarin oranges that are imported from Spain and Morocco.  They are usually sold in mesh covered small wooden boxes.  Before purchasing, check to make sure that there is no visible sign of spoilage or mold.  Clementines make an excellent snack food because they are easy to peel and section.  They also make a great addition to a fruit salad or plate.  We could not find any nutritional information for clementines.
2 (Cranberries)  Cranberries are a tart-sweet, astringent fruit that grows on trailing vines.  They are usually  available fresh in the markets only in mid to late fall.  We extend the cranberry season for another six months by freezing some of the berries in plastic containers in our freezer.  (Wash and clean thoroughly before freezing.)  The photo shows a container of frozen cranberries.  We buy extra cranberries when they are on special and freeze what we don't use immediately.  We have also found that freezing seems to increase the sweetness of the cranberries.  Select cranberries that are firm and red.  Whitish berries are unripe.  Cranberries are extremely high in sulphur, which is not listed in the Federal nutritional chart.  To enlarge the photo of the cranberries and see the nutritional chart, click on the photo or link.
2 (Dates, Amir Hajj)  Amir hajj dates are semi-sweet and soft with a large pit.  They make a great snack. We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for amir hajj dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Barhi)  Barhi dates are a more rounder variety of eating date that are soft and creamy.  These sweet delicious dates just melt in your mouth.  Each date contains a single short, fat seed. We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for barhi dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Barhi string)  These are two strings of barhi dates that have not fully ripened.  In this (khalaal) stage they are a Middle Eastern delicacy.  They are sweet and crunchy, with a slight astringent after taste.  Some of the dates in the photo are beginning to ripen into the next stage.  Each date contains a single short, fat seed. We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for barhi dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Black)  Black dates are a firmer and chewier species of date.  They are delicious eating dates that are not as sweet as some other varieties.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for black dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Black Abbada)  Black Abbada dates are sweet and chewy. They make a great snack. We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for black abbada dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Black Fingerling)  Black fingerling dates are not as sweet and have a very good, but hard to explain flavor.  They also have a long narrow seed.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for black fingerling dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Black Premo)  Black premo dates are semi-soft and sweet with a small thin seed.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for black premo dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.

2 (Dates, Bliss)  Bliss dates are a larger variety, somewhat less sweet, with a small seed and very good but an unusual flavor.  They make a great snack. We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for bliss dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Brown Fingerling)  Brown Fingerling dates are chewy and semi sweet.  They make a great snack. We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for brown fingerling dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Carmelita)  Carmelita dates are sweet and chewy with a large pit.  They make a great snack. We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for carmelita dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2

(Dates, Daisin)  Daisin dates are smaller than any of the other varieties we have encountered, and think that the name may have come about because they look like very large raisins.  Daisin dates are smaller, rounder, chewy, and somewhat less sweet, but are very good tasting.  They have a small fat pit.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for Daisin dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates - Deglet)  The deglet dates in this photo have been pitted.  They are great for snacks and for baking.  We also use them as a sweetener.  They are best stored in a covered container or resealable bag in the refrigerator, where they will stay fresh for months.  See the nutritional chart by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Dates, Deglet Noor)  These deglet noor dates are  chewy and sweet, and are lighter in color and have a better flavor than the commercial pitted variety.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for Deglet Noor dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Deglet Noor (Bread Dates))  These deglet noor dates are dryer than the deglet noor naturals we have shown separately. Like the deglet noor naturals, these deglet noor dates are chewier and sweet, and are lighter in color and have a better flavor than the commercial pitted variety. We have not seen them sold in stores. These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257. We could not find any specific nutritional information for Deglet Noor dates. For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Desert Gem)  Desert Gem is a somewhat smaller and rounder darker colored variety.  They are firmer on the outside, but have a sweet creamy inside.  Each date has a single short thick seed.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for Desert Gem dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Empress)  Empress dates are a soft and creamy-textured species that are not as sweet tasting as some other varieties of dates.  They are a delicious eating date.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for empress dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Halawi)  Halawi dates are a sweet and chewy variety of eating date, and they're much better than candy.  As can be seen in the photo, they are elongated, and each date has a single long seed. We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for halawi dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Honey)  Honey dates are a soft, creamy-textured and sweet-tasting species.  They are a delicious eating date that seems to "melt in your mouth," and are excellent for sweetening recipes; simply remove the pits and add to the recipe.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for honey dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Khadrawi)  The khadrawi dates are soft, but not as sweet as the other soft dates we have eaten.  They make a great snack. We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for khadrawi dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Khalasa)  Khalasa dates are a medium sized variety with a firmer exterior and a sweet creamy interior.  They make a much better snack than candy!  Each date has a single small elongated seed.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for Khalasa dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Krinkles)  Krinkles are chewy and not as sweet of a date with a medium sized seed. We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for Krinkles dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Mecca Gold)  Mecca Gold dates are a somewhat smaller variety of eating date.  They have a slightly heavier skin with a deliciously soft sweet interior.  The term "Gold" in the name is somewhat misleading; as can be seen in the photo, these dates are a darker variety.  Each date has a long thin seed.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for Mecca Gold dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 2 (Dates - Medjool)  The medjool dates in the full size photo are about 2 times actual size.  To us, these are one of the finest eating dates available.  The medjool dates come from Southern California.  They are sold in major supermarkets.  We purchase ours from our co-op at about $3.50 per pound.  Medjool dates come with pits, some of which we've planted to grow our own ornamental date palm trees (see photo-right: Medjool Date Palm Tree).
2 (Dates, Peanut Butter)  Peanut butter dates are a soft, creamy-textured and sweet-tasting species.  They are a delicious eating date that seems to "melt in your mouth," and are excellent for sweetening recipes; simply remove the pits and add to the recipe.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for peanut butter dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Purples)  Purples are semi sweet and chewy dates with a tougher skin.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for Purples dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Red)  Red dates are a firmer and chewier species of date.  They are delicious eating dates that are not as sweet as some other varieties.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for red dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Rhars)  Rhars dates are a species with a very sweet and soft interior.  They are a delicious eating date.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for rhars dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Sahar)  Sahar dates have a different, almost perfume-like taste, which adds to our eating pleasure.  They have small narrow seeds.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for Sahar dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Saidi-like)  Saidi-like dates are very sweet and soft larger variety with a large fat pit. We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for Saidi-like dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Sun Glow)  These delicious sunglow dates are soft with different flavor.  They make a great snack. We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for sun glow dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Sun Toffee)  Sun Toffee dates are firmer and chewier sweet variety.  They are great for a snack or for dessert.  Each date has a single long seed.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for Sun Toffee dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Tazizaoot)  Tazizaoot dates are a sweet-tasting species that have a long, slightly curved seed on the inside.  They are a delicious eating date.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for tazizaoot dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Dates, Zahidi)  Zahidi dates are a species that are firm on the outside and sweet on the inside.  They are a delicious eating date.  We have not seen them sold in stores.  These veganically grown dates were ordered directly from the grower, The Date People, P. O. Box 808, Niland, California 92257.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for zahidi dates.  For general nutritional information about dates, we suggest you look at the charts we have published with our presentation of Deglet and Medjool dates.
2 (Fig - Black)  This is a pint container of fresh black (mission) figs.  They are very soft when ripe and bruise easily.  They are usually quite expensive when purchased in the market.  Select black figs that are free of bruises, blemishes, mold, and that are not oozing any juice.  Just wash them and eat them as they are.
2 (Figs - Green)  This is a pint container of fresh ripe green figs.  "Green" refers to the color of the ripe figs.  Like other figs, they are very soft when ripe and easily bruised.  Select figs that are free of bruises and blemishes, and that are not oozing any juice.  Ripe green figs will store for a few days in the refrigerator.  Just wash them and eat them as they are.   They're great!
2 (Fig - Kalamata - dried)  Kalamata figs come from the Southwestern part of Greece.  They are most often found in "wheels" or "trays".  We suggest that you purchase dried figs without sorbate, as we find it changes the flavor.  Sorbate is used to keep the figs soft and to prevent them from "sugaring".  We believe that these Kalamata figs are the best eating of the dried figs.  They are great for snacks. See the nutritional chart by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Grapefruit)  The traditional way of eating a grapefruit is to cut it in half (across the sections), use a knife to loosen the sections and eat it with a spoon, with or without sweetener.  I enjoy peeling the grapefruit, splitting the sections apart and eating the sections without any sweetener.  Choose grapefruit that are "heavy" and without any soft spots.  Minor blemishes, like the ones shown in this photo, do not harm the quality of the fruit inside.  See nutritional chart by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Grapes - Concord)  Concord grapes are small, somewhat tart grapes with seeds.  They are used mostly for making juice, jelly and wine.  But we enjoy eating them.  In the autumn they are sold in supermarkets and roadside farm stores where grapes are grown.  When purchasing them, make sure that they are not shriveled or moldy.
2 (Grapes, Globe)  The globe grapes in this full-sized photo are approximately their actual size.  Globe grapes are a larger variety of sweet grapes and they contain seeds.  Choose globe grapes that are firm and show no signs of wrinkling, soft spots, or mold growth.  We could not find any specific nutritional data for globe grapes.  See nutritional chart for red grapes.
2 (Grapes, Red)  There are many varieties of grapes, and without being an expert, it is difficult to distinguish specific species; thus, we have simply classified these grapes as "red".  We have found that generally the red grapes are sweeter than the green varieties. Select red grapes that are firm and free of any mold.  They are best stored in the refrigerator.  See the nutritional chart by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Honeydew Melon)  The honeydew melon is one of the winter variety of melons, which also include Persian, casaba, and Crenshaw melons.  The honeydew has a smooth rind with green pulp.  Select honeydew melons that are free of blemishes.  When the ends of the melon can be depressed slightly, they are usually ripe.  We have also found that with ripe honeydew melons we can hear the seeds rattle when the melon is shaken firmly.  They will ripen on the kitchen counter, can can be stored in the refrigerator for several days.  To enlarge the photo and see the nutritional chart, click on the photo or link.
2 (Kiwi)  Kiwifruit, the fruit of a Chinese gooseberry, was first established as a commercial crop in New Zealand in 1966.  Kiwifruit are ovate, slightly tart, with a brownish "fuzzy" skin.  The entire fruit is edible.  Just for fun, we planted the very small seeds in a flowerpot of soil to see what would happen.  The result is a vine houseplant with  three-pointed leaves (no flowers or fruit).  Select kiwis that are firm, but not hard.  They may be left on the kitchen countertop to soften before eating or storing in the refrigerator.  See the nutritional chart below.
2 (Lemons)  Lemons are a very interesting citrus fruit.  They make an excellent addition to a variety of beverages and add flavor to salads and a wide variety of recipes; but, because of their tartness, they are rarely eaten by themselves.  Choose lemons that are firm and free of damage and mold.  Lemons keep very well in the refrigerator for a week or even longer.  See the nutritional charts for lemons without peel and with peel.
2 (Limes)  Limes smaller than lemons, and are oval or round in shape having a diameter of one to two inches with green flesh and skin. They can be either sour or sweet depending on the variety; however, sweet limes are not readily available in the United States. Sour limes, which are depicted here, contain citric acid giving them an acidic and tart taste, while sweet limes lack citric acid and are sweeter in flavor. They are great for adding flavor to a wide variety of recipes, and can be used as a salad dressing.  There are two general varieties of sour limes available, the Tahitian and the Key. Among Tahitian limes are the egg-shaped Persian and the smaller, seedless Bearss. Key limes, famous for the pie bearing their name, are smaller and more acidic than the Tahitian variety. Limes are originally from Southeast Asia and came to the Americas with Columbus in 1493. See the nutritional chart for limes by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Mango)  Mangos (or mangoes) are a yellowish-red tropical fruit with a firm skin.  Each mango has one large, flat seed.  The mango flesh (pulp) is orange, soft, juicy, and somewhat fibrous near the seed; and it has a sweet flavor with a hint of resin.  To enjoy their full flavor, mangos must be ripe.  The ripening process is somewhat tricky, and they can over-ripen very quickly.  We select mangos that are yellowish in color.  The hard, dark green ones seem to spoil more often when ripening, most likely due to their refrigeration during shipping.  Leave the mango on the kitchen counter to ripen.  They ripen quicker if they are with bananas.  When the mango starts to get soft, it is ready to eat.  If you are not ready to eat it, put it in the refrigerator.  Ripe mangos should be eaten within a day.  Experience is the best teacher in knowing the best time to eat a mango, and it is worth learning in order to enjoy this treat.  See our mango recipe page for instructions in cutting.  See the nutritional chart by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Melon, Casaba)  Casaba melons have a bright yellow and somewhat shriveled looking or wrinkled skin, with a flat bottom and tapered stem end.  Some casabas may be oblong in shape.  Casaba melons have a juicy, ivory to slightly pinkish colored inner flesh with a delicate fruity flavor.  Casaba melons ripen well on the counter top, but it is always best to purchase vine ripened melons.  When the bottom skin or the stem end yields to light pressure, the casaba is ripe.  See the nutritional chart for more information.
2 (Melon, Crenshaw)  Crenshaw melons are oblong with a tapered stem end, and sometimes have a blunted opposite end.  Some Crenshaw melons have been known to grow as large as watermelons.  They have a greenish skin that ripens to a bright yellow.  It is always best to purchase a vine ripened Crenshaw melon, but they will also ripen on the countertop.  When the skin, particularly on the ends, yields to gentle pressure, the Crenshaw melon is ripe.  Ripe Crenshaw melons emit a musky fragrance.  The sweet inner flesh is usually a pinkish orange, but may also be yellow or even ivory.  We could not find significant nutritional information other than that they seem to have more vitamin C and less vitamin A than a cantaloupe.
2 (Melon, Juan Canary)  Juan canary melons are oblong shaped and ripen to a bright canary yellow color.  It is best to purchase a vine ripened Juan canary melon, as they seem to take a long time to ripen on the countertop.  When fully ripe, they are very aromatic and the ivory or whitish flesh is sweet.  The flesh may also take on a pinkish tinge near the seeds.  We could not find specific nutritional information for the Juan canary melon.
2 (Melon, Orange Flesh Honeydew)  Orange flesh honeydew melons look similar to a regular honeydew, but the rind takes on a light orange or pale coral pink color when ripe.  The inner flesh looks similar to a cantaloupe's.  It is best to purchase a vine ripened orange flesh melon, but they do ripen on the counter top.  When the rind yields to gentle pressure, the orange flesh honeydew is ripe.  They are very flavorful.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for the orange flesh honeydew melon.
2 (Melon, Persian)  The Persian melon has a greenish "netted" rind similar to a cantaloupe's, but may lose its greenish color as it ripens, as in this photo.  It is best to purchase vine ripened Persian melons, but they ripen well on the countertop.  When the rind yields to gentle pressure or develops slight depressions, the melon is ripe.  Persian melons also have a cantaloupe-like aroma when ripe, and are similar in flavor to a cantaloupe.  We could not find specific nutritional information for Persian melons.
2 (Melon, Santa Claus or Christmas)  Santa Claus melons look something like small watermelons, but have distinctive tan colored "stretch lines."  It is best to purchase vine ripened Santa Claus melons, but they ripen well on the countertop.  When the ends yield to gentle pressure, the Santa Claus melon is ripe.  The inner flesh is a greenish color similar to that of a honeydew melon, but the flavor is sweeter than a honeydew's.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for the Santa Claus melon.
2 (Melon, Sharlyne)  The sharlyne melon can be easily identified by the 'netted' green rind, that according to some sources ripens to orange, but this particular sharlyne melon was very ripe.  The difference may be when they are picked and shipped to market.  So, we suggest that when the melon softens to light squeezing, and becomes aromatic, it is most likely ripe. The flesh is nearly white, and is very soft and sweet and almost melts in your mouth.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for the sharlyne melon.
2 (Nectarine)  Nectarines are a deliciously sweet member of the peach family, but nectarines are not, as some people believe, a cross between a peach and a plum.  One nectarine has about 65 calories and provides about one-fifth of the daily requirement of vitamin A.  Choose nectarines that are deep yellow to red in color without soft spots.  Nectarines will ripen at room temperature.   See the nutritional information and a photo or a half nectarine by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Nectarines - Dried)  Dried nectarines are sweet and very chewy.  It is relatively difficult to find a place that sells them.  The only source we have found is our food co-operative where they are sold in 5 lb bulk packages.
2 (Nectarines, White) Nectarines and peaches are the same species, except for the fact that nectarines are the product of a recessive gene that makes them smooth skinned. But we have found that their is also a difference in flavor, too, and believe that nectarines are more flavorful. The white nectarines are much sweeter than the yellow variety, and also have a perfumed aroma, which adds to the delight of eating them. We have not found them for sale in supermarkets, or at least they weren't labeled as being 'white', so we usually buy them at farm stores. If we can find a box of 'seconds', we always by them, because the amount of waste is generally small, making them a great value. They are great for eating whole, for freezing, in smoothies, and making frozen desserts. We could not find any nutritional information specifically related to white nectarines.
2 (Oranges, Navel)  Navel oranges derive their name from a navel-like (belly button) growth at the bottom of the orange (top orange in photo).  One of the nice features of this delicious, sweet, eating orange is that it is seedless - just peel it and eat the sections.  Navel oranges are great for breakfast, a snack, or for dessert.  Choose navel oranges that are firm and "heavy" for their size.  See the nutritional chart by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Papaya, large red)  The large red papaya (photo above) ripened to this yellow color on our countertop.  Select a papaya that is firm and free of blemishes and damage (the brown spotting is natural and is present even when the papaya is still green).  A papaya is a real treat for breakfast, dessert, or a snack (see our recipe).  Save the seeds to make a great salad dressing.  To see the nutritional chart and other information, click on the photo or link.
2 (Peaches)  Peaches have a wonderfully sweet flavor when they are ripe.  When a peach is ripe it has a creamy yellow and red color, as pictured.  Select peaches that are beginning to get soft.  Very hard peaches may not ripen properly, and green peaches will not develop their proper flavor.  Peaches can be ripened on the kitchen counter, but ripe peaches should be stored in the refrigerator.  (See enlarged photo of a peach half) Peaches are a good source of vitamin A (in the form of carotenes), potassium and fiber.  See more complete nutrition information by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Peaches, Donut) Donut peaches get their name from their flattened shape and depressed center, which resembles a donut. We purchased these sweet and flavorful donut peaches at a local farm store, where their cost was less that half that of the supermarket. Ripe donut peaches are very juicy, and are one of the best tasting peaches we have eaten. They also have a small free-stone pit, and are the least fuzziest of the peaches we have tried. Wisegeek says: "The origins of the donut peach can be found in Asia, where flat peaches have been cultivated for centuries. In the mid-1800s, several varieties were exported to the United States, and Chinese flat peaches, as they were called, became popular for a brief period of time. The fruits fell out of fashion, however, and the flat peach was considered an essentially lost heirloom variety until the 1990s, when it began to enter widespread cultivation again." We could not find any nutritional information specifically for donut or flat peaches.  For general nutritional information see peaches.
2 (Peaches, White)  There are more than a dozen varieties of white peaches that ripen throughout the Summer and into the beginning of Fall.  This variety of free-stone white peaches were purchased at a farm store in the beginning of October.  Their skin has the standard peach coloration on the outside with a creamy white background that is often more visible that the one in this photo, and they have a creamy white flesh on the inside.  The split peach is a very tree-ripened peach, which was deliciously sweet and had a flowery perfume aroma.  Many of the pits split when the preaches are cut in half. We could not find any specific nutritional information for white peaches, so we have included only general peach nutritional information.
2 (Pears - Bosc)  Bosc pears are our favorite variety.  They are nice and "crunchy" and flavorful.  Select pears that are firm and free of blemishes.  We could not find a nutritional chart specifically for bosc pears.  See the nutritional chart for pears, in general, by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Pears, red Clapp)  Red Clapp pears have been described as having a red blush, but as can be seen in this photo, they can also develop a deep red colored skin.  They are the reddest of all pears, and have a white flesh. The flavor of these red Clapp pears is very similar to Bartlett pears, but they don't seem to get as soft as a Bartlett.  One reference we saw indicated that these red Clapp pears were developed in Massachusetts around 1850.  They have a relatively short storage life.  We could not find any specific nutritional information for red Clapp pears, so we included only average nutritional information for all varieties of pears.
2 (Persimmon)  Persimmons, known as the "apple of the Orient," were brought to the Americas about 1825.  They are a tart fruit when firm, but sweeten as they soften.  They have an excellent flavor; but, if not ripened enough, often leave a stong "astringent" feel to the mouth.  The persimmon color can vary from a deep yellowish-orange to a red, and the color carries through to the inner fruit, as can be seen in the photo (bottom).  Choose persimmons that are yellowing, shiny, and free of defects.  When softened, place in the refrigerator.  They are good raw or halved and broiled.  They may also be used in recipes.  However, over-cooking can make persimmons tough and tasteless. See the nutritional chart for both the Japanese and native US varieties of persimmon (the native chart is incomplete).
2 (Pineapple)  Ripe pineapples have a deliciously sweet flavor.  They also contain a digestive enzyme, bromelain.  With the exception of vitamin C and Potassium, pineapples do not contain very much of the other vitamins and minerals.  According to what we have read, bromelain is a natural anti-inflammatory that has many health benefits and encourages healing.   Choose pineapples by their "pineapple" fragrance, and with some golden yellow color.   They should be heavy for their size and have no soft spots.  Pineapples do not ripen once they have been cut from the plant, so select ripe ones at the time of purchase.  See the nutritional chart below.
2 (Plantain)  The plantain, scientifically named Musa paradisiaca, is a very starchy banana that is usually used in cooking.  However, they can also be eaten raw when they are very ripe with the skin turning almost completely black.  (See Ripe Plantain.)  It is usually not considered an eating banana like the ones we are used to peeling and eating, though we have eaten them that way after peeling them with a knife.  We first became acquainted with the plantain in the late 1960's when we visited Jamaica.  Until about 1990, we rarely saw them being sold in supermarkets, but today they are common in the tropical fruit and vegetable section.  They are usually sold green, but occasionally we find ripe ones.  If the plantains are green, let them ripen on the kitchen counter until they turn yellow, as in the picture above.  Plantains do not peel like eating bananas.  We have found that the easiest way to peel a plantain is to cut off the two ends with a knife, slit the skin lengthwise, and then peel it.  (If you do not need the plantain whole, cutting it in half also makes it easier to peel.)  The above left insert photo is of a whole peeled plantain.  Try our plantain recipes for baked plantain, baked plantain with tofu and brown rice, and others.  See nutritional information below.
2 (Plums, Black)  There are many varieties of plums, each of which have differing flavors and nutritional values.  We believe that the black plum is the sweetest.  It also has the advantage of having a very small pit, thus providing more edible flesh.  Choose black plums that are firm to just beginning to soften but not hard or mushy.  This black plum will ripen at room temperature.  See nutritional information by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Plums, Red)  We have not been able to identify the exact variety of the various plums we encounter, as usually they are unidentified or referred to by their color.  The red plum is a medium-sweet plum.  Choose red plums that are firm to just beginning to soften.  Do not select hard or mushy plums.  Red plums will ripen at room temperature.  See nutritional information by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Plums, Red Spotted)  We were unable to identify this specific variety of plums.  These spotted red plums are sweeter than the other red plums and have a small pit like the black plums.  Select firm to just beginning to soften plums, as the softer ones could be damaged.  They ripen easily on the counter-top, and will store for more than a week in the refrigerator.  Since we could not specifically identify this plum, we have included only general nutritional information for plums.
2 (Pomegranate)  The pomegranate is a thick-skinned several-celled reddish berry that is about the size of an orange.  It has sweet/tart, juicy edible seeds.  Pomegranates appear to be a seasonal fruit, available as an import in our area only in autumn and winter.  We split them open with a knife and have fun picking out the juicy seeds and eating them.  See the nutritional chart by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Pummelo, Red)  As the scientific name implies, the pummelo is the largest of all citrus fruits.  Unfortunately, it is also sold at an inflated price.  The pummelo is the fruit from which the modern grapefruit was developed, but they are much sweeter than most grapefruits.  When purchasing pummelos, select the heavier solid fruit and avoid the light weight ones, as they are of inferior quality and most likely dried out on the inside.  They are easy to peel and relatively easy to section.  One of the delightful features of the pummelo is its wonderful aroma which emanates from the peel.  See nutritional information and enlarge the photo of the pummelo by clicking on the photo or link.
2 2 (Prickly Pear)  Prickly pear and Indian fig are common names for cactus fruit (Opuntia stricta), which grows on the Nopal cactus, a southern Florida native. Studded with barbs, the prickly pear fruits are oval and 3 to 4 inches long, with skin colors ranging from reddish to greenish-yellow to orange-tan. The reddish-purple flesh contains hard, edible seeds which, unfortunately, take away some of the fun of eating this sweet fruit which is a good source for vitamin C. Available in the produce department from August to December, purchase prickly pears that give slightly to pressure and allow them to ripen until soft on your countertop. When ripe they may be refrigerated for up to a week. When ready to eat, carefully avoid the barbs while slicing off both ends. Then score down the length of the skin and peel it away. The fruit may be cut into pieces for eating. (Photo-right) To enlarge the photos and see the nutritional chart, click on the photo or link.
2 (Raisins, Thompson Seedless)  These Thompson seedless raisins, like all dried fruit, are high in calories because of the concentrated sugar.  Choose raisins that are not dried out or have sugar crystals on them, as do a few of the ones in this picture.  See the nutritional information by clicking on the photo or link.
Red Raspberries, Frozen (Raspberries, Red, Frozen) When we want red raspberries, we usually buy them frozen, since they are available year round and can be found in most supermarkets. Another advantage is that frozen red raspberries can be stored in the freezer for months, so they are always available. We love to add them to cereal and mixed fruit recipes, where they add a sweet-tart taste. There are several species of red raspberries, but all have a similar taste. We could not find specific information for frozen red raspberries, so we included only the information for the raw raspberries.
2 (Strawberries)  Strawberries are a delicious fruit that is both beautiful and nutritious.  Choose strawberries that are bright red without green areas, and that are relatively firm and free of soft spots and mold.  Green (unripe) sections can be seen on the sides of the two lower strawberries.  See the nutritional chart below.
2 (Tangerines)  Tangerines have less vitamin C than oranges, but they are a better source of vitamin A.  Choose tangerines that are firm but not dried out.  Some varieties have a loose skin and may feel slightly soft.  They should feel heavy for their size.  See nutritional information by clicking on the photo or link.
2 (Watermelon, Seedless)  Seedless watermelon, as the name implies, has very few to no seeds.  These seedless watermelons are a delicious and nutritious treat for any breakfast, desserts, or snacks.  The larger ones are generally sweeter, as the sugar content increases with age.  Another indication of older fruit is that they have a yellow under-belly resulting from the length of time the fruit rested on the ground.  Select firm watermelons that are free of damage.  Soft spots can be an indication of the beginning of inner fermentation.  Keep refrigerated when cut.  One of the advantages of buying seedless watermelon is that fewer pesticides are needed for growing this variety.  We could not find specific nutritional information for seedless watermelons, so we have included a general watermelon nutritional chart.